savor

[sey-ver]

noun

verb (used without object)

to have savor, taste, or odor.
to exhibit the peculiar characteristics; smack (often followed by of): His business practices savor of greed.

verb (used with object)


Also especially British, sa·vour.

Origin of savor

1175–1225; (noun) Middle English sav(o)ur < Old French savour < Latin sapōrem, accusative of sapor taste, derivative of sapere to taste (cf. sapient); (v.) Middle English sav(o)uren < Old French savourer < Late Latin sapōrāre, derivative of sapor
Related formssa·vor·er, nounsa·vor·ing·ly, adverbsa·vor·less, adjectivesa·vor·ous, adjectiveout·sa·vor, verb (used with object)un·sa·vored, adjective
Can be confusedsavior savor savory

Synonyms for savor

Usage note

See -or1.
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019


Examples from the Web for savor

Contemporary Examples of savor

Historical Examples of savor

  • It was well that the attic should be cleaned, though the savor of the task was gone.

    Tiverton Tales

    Alice Brown

  • It held within it all the savor of a happy past; it satisfied her hungry soul.

    Meadow Grass

    Alice Brown

  • He is the salt of the earth, and if the salt lose its savor, wherewith shall it be salted?

  • Confusedly the savor of Abel's sacrifice was sweet to His nostrils, not Cain's fruits.

  • She abandoned herself to the savor of it, the girl forgotten.


Word Origin and History for savor
n.

mid-13c., from Old French savor "flavor, taste; sauce, seasoning; delight, pleasure," from Latin saporem (nominative sapor) "taste, flavor," related to sapere "to have a flavor" (see sapient).

v.

c.1300, from Old French savorer "taste, breathe in; appreciate, care for," from Late Latin saporare, from Latin sapor (see savor (n.)). Related: Savored; savoring.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper