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scandal

[ skan-dl ]
/ ˈskæn dl /
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noun

verb (used with object), scan·daled, scan·dal·ing or (especially British) scan·dalled, scan·dal·ling.

British Dialect. to defame (someone) by spreading scandal.
Obsolete. to disgrace.

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Origin of scandal

1175–1225; from Late Latin scandalum from Late Greek skándalon “snare, cause of moral stumbling”; replacing Middle English scandle from Old French (north) escandle from Late Latin, as above
4. See gossip.
min·i·scan·dal, nounsu·per·scan·dal, noun
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2021

British Dictionary definitions for scandal

scandal
/ (ˈskændəl) /

noun

verb (tr) obsolete

to disgrace
to scandalize
scandalous, adjectivescandalously, adverbscandalousness, noun
C16: from Late Latin scandalum stumbling block, from Greek skandalon a trap
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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