QUIZZES

DON’T VACILLATE! VANQUISH THIS WORD OF THE DAY QUIZ!

It’d be a real faux pas to miss this quiz on the words from August 3–9, 2020!
Question 1 of 7
What does “vacillate” mean?

Origin of sear

1
before 900; (adj.) Middle English sere,Old English sēar; cognate with Dutch zoor; (v.) Middle English seren,Old English sēarian, derivative of sēar

synonym study for sear

1. See burn1.

OTHER WORDS FROM sear

un·seared, adjective

Definition for sear (2 of 2)

sear2
[ seer ]
/ sɪər /

noun

a pivoted piece that holds the hammer at full cock or half cock in the firing mechanism of small arms.

Origin of sear

2
1550–60; <Middle French serre a grip, derivative of serrer to lock up, close <Vulgar Latin *serrāre, for Late Latin serāre to bar (a door), derivative of Latin sera door-bar; Vulgar Latin -rr- unexplained
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2020

Example sentences from the Web for sear

British Dictionary definitions for sear (1 of 2)

sear1
/ (sɪə) /

verb (tr)

to scorch or burn the surface of
to brand with a hot iron
to cause to wither or dry up
rare to make callous or unfeeling

noun

a mark caused by searing

adjective

poetic dried up

Word Origin for sear

Old English sēarian to become withered, from sēar withered; related to Old High German sōrēn, Greek hauos dry, Sanskrit sōsa drought

British Dictionary definitions for sear (2 of 2)

sear2
/ (sɪə) /

noun

the catch in the lock of a small firearm that holds the hammer or firing pin cocked

Word Origin for sear

C16: probably from Old French serre a clasp, from serrer to hold firmly, from Late Latin sērāre to bolt, from Latin sera a bar
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012