seduce

[ si-doos, -dyoos ]
/ sɪˈdus, -ˈdyus /

verb (used with object), se·duced, se·duc·ing.

to lead astray, as from duty, rectitude, or the like; corrupt.
to persuade or induce to have sexual intercourse.
to lead or draw away, as from principles, faith, or allegiance: He was seduced by the prospect of gain.
to win over; attract; entice: a supermarket seducing customers with special sales.

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Origin of seduce

1470–80; < Latin sēdūcere to lead aside, equivalent to sē- se- + dūcere to lead; replacing earlier seduise < Middle French < Latin, as above

OTHER WORDS FROM seduce

Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2020

Example sentences from the Web for seducer

British Dictionary definitions for seducer (1 of 2)

seducer

feminine seductress (sɪˈdʌktrɪs)

/ (sɪˈdjuːsə) /

noun

a person who entices, allures, or seduces, esp one who entices another to engage in sexual intercourse

British Dictionary definitions for seducer (2 of 2)

seduce
/ (sɪˈdjuːs) /

verb (tr)

to persuade to engage in sexual intercourse
to lead astray, as from the right action
to win over, attract, or lure

Derived forms of seduce

seducible or seduceable, adjective

Word Origin for seduce

C15: from Latin sēdūcere to lead apart, from sē- apart + dūcere to lead
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012