humiliation

[hyoo-mil-ee-ey-shuhn or, often, yoo-]

Origin of humiliation

1350–1400; Middle English < Late Latin humiliātiōn- (stem of humiliātiō). See humiliate, -ion
Related formsre·hu·mil·i·a·tion, nounself-hu·mil·i·a·tion, noun

Synonyms for humiliation

Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018

Examples from the Web for self-humiliation

Historical Examples of self-humiliation

  • Self-humiliation is the first step to knowledge, even of the commonest things.

    Alcibiades I

    (may be spurious) Plato

  • It was the self-humiliation of the government of peace before the Genius of War.

  • As he sat there by the water he touched the depths of self-humiliation.

    Robert Elsmere

    Mrs. Humphry Ward

  • "I am afraid you are right, Mr. Jonson," said I, in a tone of self-humiliation.

    Pelham, Complete

    Edward Bulwer-Lytton

  • It was a self-humiliation which a lover would have avoided at all costs, he thought.

    A Laodicean

    Thomas Hardy


Word Origin and History for self-humiliation

humiliation

n.

late 14c., from Late Latin humiliationem (nominative humiliatio) "humbling, humiliation," noun of action from past participle stem of humiliare "to humble," from humilis "humble" (see humble).

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper