sere

1

or sear

[seer]
||

adjective

dry; withered.

Nearby words

  1. serbo-croatian,
  2. serbonian,
  3. serbs, croats, and slovenes, kingdom of the,
  4. sercq,
  5. serdab,
  6. serein,
  7. seremban,
  8. serena,
  9. serena, la,
  10. serenade

Origin of sere

1
before 900; Middle English seer(e), Old English sēar; see sear1

sere

2
[seer]

noun

the series of stages in an ecological succession.

Origin of sere

2
First recorded in 1915–20; back formation from series

Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for sere


British Dictionary definitions for sere

sere

1

sear

adjective

archaic dried up or withered

verb, noun

a rare spelling of sear 1 (def. 1)

Word Origin for sere

Old English sēar; see sear 1

noun

the series of changes occurring in the ecological succession of a particular community

Word Origin for sere

C20: from series

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for sere

sere

adj.

Old English sear "dried up, withered, barren," from Proto-Germanic *sauzas (cf. Middle Low German sor, Dutch zoor), from PIE root *saus- "dry" (cf. Sanskrit susyati "dries, withers;" Old Persian uška- "dry" (adj.), "land" (n.); Avestan huška- "dry;" Latin sudus "dry"). A good word now relegated to bad poetry. Related to sear. Sere month was an old name for "August."

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper

Science definitions for sere

sere

[sîr]

The entire sequence of ecological communities successively occupying an area from the initial stage to the climax community. See more at succession.
The American Heritage® Science Dictionary Copyright © 2011. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.