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seton

[ seet-n ]
/ ˈsit n /
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noun Surgery.

a thread or the like inserted beneath the skin to provide drainage or to guide subsequent passage of a tube.

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Origin of seton

1350–1400; Middle English <Medieval Latin sētōn- (stem of sētō), equivalent to sēt(a) seta + -ōn- noun suffix

Definition for seton (2 of 2)

Seton
[ seet-n ]
/ ˈsit n /

noun

Saint Elizabeth Ann (Bayley) "Mother Seton", 1774–1821, U.S. educator, social-welfare reformer, and religious leader: first native-born American to be canonized (1975).
Ernest Thompson, 1860–1946, English writer and illustrator in the U.S.
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2021

Example sentences from the Web for seton

British Dictionary definitions for seton (1 of 2)

set on

verb (tr)

(preposition) to cause to attackthey set the dogs on him
(adverb) to instigate or incite; urgehe set the child on to demand food

British Dictionary definitions for seton (2 of 2)

Seton
/ (ˈsiːtən) /

noun

Ernest Thompson. 1860–1946, US author and illustrator of animal books, born in England
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Medical definitions for seton

seton
[ sētn ]

n.

Material such as thread, wire, or gauze that is passed through subcutaneous tissues or through a cyst in order to form a sinus or fistula.
The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.

Idioms and Phrases with seton

set on

Also, set upon.

1

Attack; see set at.

2

Instigate, urge one to engage in action, as in The older boys set on the young ones to get in trouble. [Early 1500s]

3

be set on or upon. Be determined to, as in He's set on studying law.

The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.
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