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seton

[ seet-n ]
/ ˈsit n /
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noun Surgery.
a thread or the like inserted beneath the skin to provide drainage or to guide subsequent passage of a tube.
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Origin of seton

1350–1400; Middle English <Medieval Latin sētōn- (stem of sētō), equivalent to sēt(a) seta + -ōn- noun suffix

Other definitions for seton (2 of 2)

Seton
[ seet-n ]
/ ˈsit n /

noun
Saint Elizabeth Ann (Bayley) "Mother Seton", 1774–1821, U.S. educator, social-welfare reformer, and religious leader: first native-born American to be canonized (1975).
Ernest Thompson, 1860–1946, English writer and illustrator in the U.S.
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2022

How to use seton in a sentence

British Dictionary definitions for seton (1 of 2)

set on

verb (tr)
(preposition) to cause to attackthey set the dogs on him
(adverb) to instigate or incite; urgehe set the child on to demand food

British Dictionary definitions for seton (2 of 2)

Seton
/ (ˈsiːtən) /

noun
Ernest Thompson. 1860–1946, US author and illustrator of animal books, born in England
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Other Idioms and Phrases with seton

set on

Also, set upon.

1

Attack; see set at.

2

Instigate, urge one to engage in action, as in The older boys set on the young ones to get in trouble. [Early 1500s]

3

be set on or upon. Be determined to, as in He's set on studying law.

The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.
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