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shoo

[ shoo ]
/ ʃu /
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interjection

(used to scare or drive away a cat, dog, chickens, birds, etc.)

verb (used with object), shooed, shoo·ing.

to drive away by saying or shouting “shoo.”
to request or force (a person) to leave: I'll have to shoo you out of here now.

verb (used without object), shooed, shoo·ing.

to call out “shoo.”

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“Evoke” and “invoke” both derive from the same Latin root “vocāre.”

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Origin of shoo

1475–85; earlier showe, shough, shooh, ssou (interjection), imitative; compare German schu

WORDS THAT MAY BE CONFUSED WITH shoo

shoe, shoo
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2021

How to use shoo in a sentence

British Dictionary definitions for shoo

shoo
/ (ʃuː) /

interjection

go away!: used to drive away unwanted or annoying people, animals, etc

verb shoos, shooing or shooed

(tr) to drive away by or as if by crying "shoo."
(intr) to cry "shoo."

Word Origin for shoo

C15: imitative; related to Middle High German schū, French shou, Italian scio
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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