Origin of shuffle

1525–35; < Low German schuffeln to walk clumsily or with dragging feet, mix (cards); akin to shovel

OTHER WORDS FROM shuffle

re·shuf·fle, verb re·shuf·fled, re·shuf·fling, nounun·shuf·fled, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

British Dictionary definitions for shuffle off (1 of 2)

shuffle off

verb

(tr, adverb) to thrust off or put asideshuffle off responsibility

British Dictionary definitions for shuffle off (2 of 2)

shuffle
/ (ˈʃʌfəl) /

verb

noun

the act or an instance of shuffling
a dance or dance step with short dragging movements of the feet

Derived forms of shuffle

shuffler, noun

Word Origin for shuffle

C16: probably from Low German schüffeln; see shove
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Idioms and Phrases with shuffle off

shuffle off

1

Get rid of, act evasively, as in They've tried to shuffle off public inquiries about the safety of their planes. This usage, dating from about 1600, also appears in the oft-quoted shuffle off this mortal coil, from Shakespeare's Hamlet (3:1), where it means “become freed from the turmoil of life,” that is, “die.”

2

Move away reluctantly, dragging one's feet, as in The prisoners shuffled off to their work detail. [Late 1500s]

The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.