slip-stitch

[slip-stich]

Origin of slip-stitch

First recorded in 1895–1900

slip stitch

noun Sewing.
  1. a loose stitch taken between two layers of fabric, as on a facing or hem, so as to be invisible on the right side or outside surface, used in stoating.

Origin of slip stitch

First recorded in 1880–85
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018

Examples from the Web for slip-stitch

Historical Examples of slip-stitch

  • Every row is worked the same, with a slip-stitch at the beginning;—knit one; pearl one.

    My Knitting Book

    Miss Lambert

  • Observe at the commencement of every row to make a slip-stitch.

    My Knitting Book

    Miss Lambert

  • To slip-stitch means to take a stitch from the left-hand to the right-hand needle without knitting it, and its abbreviation is sl.

  • First row—bring the wool forward, slip one; knit two, pass the slip-stitch over them.

    My Knitting Book

    Miss Lambert

  • Third row—bring the wool forward, knit three; bring the wool forward, slip one; knit two together, pass the slip-stitch over them.

    My Knitting Book

    Miss Lambert


British Dictionary definitions for slip-stitch

slip stitch

noun
  1. a sewing stitch for securing hems, etc, in which only two or three threads of the material are caught up by the needle each time, so that the stitches are nearly invisible from the right side
verb
  1. (tr) to join (two edges) using slip stitches

Word Origin for slip stitch

C19: from slip 1
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012