solenoid

[ soh-luh-noid, sol-uh- ]
/ ˈsoʊ ləˌnɔɪd, ˈsɒl ə- /

noun

Electricity. an electric conductor wound as a helix with small pitch, or as two or more coaxial helices, so that current through the conductor establishes a magnetic field within the conductor.
Also called solenoid switch. a switch controlled by such an arrangement, in which a metal rod moves when the current is turned on: used in automotive starting systems.
Meteorology. a space formed by the intersection of isobaric and isosteric surfaces.

Origin of solenoid

1825–35; < French solénoïde < Greek sōlḗn pipe, channel + French -oïde -oid
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for solenoid

British Dictionary definitions for solenoid

solenoid

/ (ˈsəʊlɪˌnɔɪd) /

noun

a coil of wire, usually cylindrical, in which a magnetic field is set up by passing a current through it
a coil of wire, partially surrounding an iron core, that is made to move inside the coil by the magnetic field set up by a current: used to convert electrical to mechanical energy, as in the operation of a switch
such a device used as a relay, as in a motor vehicle for connecting the battery directly to the starter motor when activated by the ignition switch

Derived Forms

solenoidal, adjectivesolenoidally, adverb

Word Origin for solenoid

C19: from French solénoïde, from Greek sōlēn a pipe, tube
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Science definitions for solenoid

solenoid

[ sōlə-noid′ ]

A coil of wire that acts as an electromagnet when electric current is passed through it, often used to control the motion of metal objects, such as the switch of a relay.
The American Heritage® Science Dictionary Copyright © 2011. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.