souterrain

[soo-tuh-reyn, soo-tuh-reyn]

Origin of souterrain

1725–35; < French: literally, underground, calque of Latin subterrāneus; see sous-sous, terrain
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018

Examples from the Web for souterrain

Historical Examples of souterrain

  • In many cases we do find the entrance to a souterrain is in a fort.

    Ulster Folklore

    Elizabeth Andrews

  • It is a souterrain situated in Glenshesk, about three miles from Ballycastle.

    Ulster Folklore

    Elizabeth Andrews

  • It is a small fort, and on the top we saw the narrow entrance to the souterrain.

    Ulster Folklore

    Elizabeth Andrews

  • My best thanks are also due to Mrs. Hobson for allowing me to make use of her photograph of the entrance to this souterrain.

    Ulster Folklore

    Elizabeth Andrews

  • She describes it as "a souterrain containing six chambers, with a length of eighty-seven feet exclusive of a flooded chamber."

    Ulster Folklore

    Elizabeth Andrews


British Dictionary definitions for souterrain

souterrain

noun
  1. archaeol an underground chamber or passage

Word Origin for souterrain

C18: from French
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012