wheel

[ hweel, weel ]
/ ʰwil, wil /

noun

verb (used with object)

verb (used without object)

Idioms for wheel

Origin of wheel

before 900; (noun) Middle English whel(e), Old English hwēol, hweohl; cognate with Dutch wiel, Old Norse hjōl; akin to Greek kýklos (see cycle); (v.) Middle English, derivative of the noun

OTHER WORDS FROM wheel

wheel·less, adjectiveun·der·wheel, nounun·wheel, verb (used with object)
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

British Dictionary definitions for spin one's wheels

wheel
/ (wiːl) /

noun

verb

See also wheels

Derived forms of wheel

wheel-less, adjective

Word Origin for wheel

Old English hweol, hweowol; related to Old Norse hvēl, Greek kuklos, Middle Low German wēl, Dutch wiel
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Idioms and Phrases with spin one's wheels (1 of 2)

spin one's wheels

Expend effort with no result, as in We're just spinning our wheels here while management tries to make up its mind. This idiom, with its image of a vehicle in snow or sand that spins its wheels but cannot move, dates from the mid-1900s.

Idioms and Phrases with spin one's wheels (2 of 2)

wheel

In addition to the idioms beginning with wheel

  • wheel and deal
  • wheels in motion
  • wheels within wheels

also see:

  • asleep at the switch (wheel)
  • at the wheel
  • big cheese (wheel)
  • cog in the wheel
  • fifth wheel
  • grease (oil) the wheels
  • hell on wheels
  • put one's shoulder to the wheel
  • reinvent the wheel
  • set (wheels) in motion
  • spin one's wheels
  • squeaky wheel gets the grease
The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.