stop-loss

[stop-laws, -los]
adjective
  1. designed or planned to prevent continued loss, as a customer's order to a broker to sell a stock if its price declines to a specific amount.

Origin of stop-loss

First recorded in 1900–05
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018

Examples from the Web for stop-loss

Historical Examples of stop-loss

  • Then too we had a "stop-loss" on the Stock so that we were safe, whatever happened.

    The Van Dwellers

    Albert Bigelow Paine

  • Fractional advances we threw into the next day's good measure, and set the stop-loss higher, and yet ever higher.

    The Van Dwellers

    Albert Bigelow Paine

  • No more money will be put up on this deal, so place a stop-loss order against it.

    Get-Rich-Quick Wallingford

    George Randolph Chester

  • A "stop-loss" is an order to your broker to sell you out if the market sells down a certain number of points.

  • A large number of stop-loss orders is a good thing for the short interests.


British Dictionary definitions for stop-loss

stop-loss

adjective
  1. commerce of or relating to an order to a broker in a commodity or security market to close an open position at a specified price in order to limit any loss
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012