QUIZZES

CHALLENGE YOURSELF WITH THESE WORDS FROM "LITTLE WOMEN"

"Little Women" may be a classic, but that doesn't mean we all know the meanings of the vocab words from the book. Can you define these words correctly and make Jo proud?
Question 1 of 10
earnest

Idioms for take

Origin of take

before 1100; Middle English taken to take, strike, lay hold of, grasp, late Old English tacan to grasp, touch < Old Norse taka to take; cognate with Middle Dutch taken to grasp, Gothic tekan to touch

synonym study for take

1. See bring.

OTHER WORDS FROM take

tak·a·ble, take·a·ble, adjectivetak·er, nounun·tak·a·ble, adjectiveun·take·a·ble, adjective

WORDS THAT MAY BE CONFUSED WITH take

bring take (see synonym study at bring)
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2020

British Dictionary definitions for take on (1 of 3)

take on

verb (adverb, mainly tr)

to employ or hireto take on new workmen
to assume or acquirehis voice took on a plaintive note
to agree to do; undertakeI'll take on that job for you
to compete against, oppose, or fightI will take him on at tennis; I'll take him on any time
(intr) informal to exhibit great emotion, esp grief

British Dictionary definitions for take on (2 of 3)

take1
/ (teɪk) /

verb takes, taking, took or taken (mainly tr)

noun

Derived forms of take

takable or takeable, adjective

Word Origin for take

Old English tacan, from Old Norse taka; related to Gothic tekan to touch

British Dictionary definitions for take on (3 of 3)

take2
/ (ˈtɑːkɪ) /

noun

NZ a topic or cause

Word Origin for take

Māori
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Idioms and Phrases with take on (1 of 2)

take on

1

Undertake or begin to deal with, as in I took on new responsibilities, or She took on too much when she accepted both assignments. [Early 1300s]

2

Hire, engage, as in We take on extra workers during the busy season. [Early 1600s]

3

Oppose in competition, as in This young wrestler was willing to take on all comers. [Late 1800s]

4

Display strong emotion, as in Don't take on so. [Colloquial; early 1400s]

5

Acquire as, or as if, one's own, as in He took on the look of a prosperous banker. [Late 1700s]

Idioms and Phrases with take on (2 of 2)

take

The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.