cleaner

[ klee-ner ]
/ ˈkli nər /

noun

a person who cleans, especially one whose regular occupation is cleaning offices, buildings, equipment, etc.
an apparatus or machine for cleaning, as a vacuum cleaner.
a preparation for use in cleaning, as a detergent or chemical bleach.
the owner or operator of a dry-cleaning establishment: The cleaner said he couldn't get the spot off my coat.
Usually cleaners. a dry-cleaning establishment: My suit is at the cleaners.

Idioms

    take to the cleaners, Slang. to cause to lose all or a great deal of one's money or personal property, as through gambling or a bad investment: He got taken to the cleaners in the poker game last night.

Origin of cleaner

First recorded in 1425–75, cleaner is from the late Middle English word clener. See clean, -er1

Related forms

pre·clean·er, noun
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

British Dictionary definitions for take to the cleaners

cleaner

/ (ˈkliːnə) /

noun

a person, device, chemical agent, etc, that removes dirt, as from clothes or carpets
(usually plural) a shop, etc that provides a dry-cleaning service
take a person to the cleaners informal to rob or defraud a person of all of his money
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Idioms and Phrases with take to the cleaners

take to the cleaners


1

Take or cheat one out of all of one's money or possessions, as in Her divorce lawyer took him to the cleaners, or That broker has taken a number of clients to the cleaners. [Slang; early 1900s]

2

Drub, beat up, as in He didn't just push you—he took you to the cleaners. [Slang; early 1900s]

The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.