tenia

[tee-nee-uh]
|

noun, plural te·ni·ae [tee-nee-ee] /ˈti niˌi/.


Nearby words

  1. teng hsiao-p'ing,
  2. teng hsiao-ping,
  3. tenge,
  4. tengri khan,
  5. tengri nor,
  6. tenia choroidea,
  7. tenia coli,
  8. teniacide,
  9. teniafuge,
  10. tenial

taenia

or te·ni·a

[tee-nee-uh]

noun, plural tae·ni·ae [tee-nee-ee] /ˈti niˌi/.

Classical Antiquity. a headband or fillet.
Architecture. (on a Doric entablature) a fillet or band separating the frieze from the architrave.
Anatomy. a ribbonlike structure, as certain bands of white nerve fibers in the brain.
any tapeworm of the genus Taenia, parasitic in humans and other mammals.

Origin of taenia

1555–65; < Latin < Greek tainía band, ribbon; (in def 4) < New Latin, Latin, as above

Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for tenia



British Dictionary definitions for tenia

tenia

noun plural -niae (-nɪˌiː)

the US spelling of taenia

taenia

US tenia

noun plural -niae (-nɪˌiː)

(in ancient Greece) a narrow fillet or headband for the hair
architect the fillet between the architrave and frieze of a Doric entablature
anatomy any bandlike structure or part
any tapeworm of the genus Taenia, such as T. soleum, a parasite of man that uses the pig as its intermediate host

Word Origin for taenia

C16: via Latin from Greek tainia narrow strip; related to Greek teinein to stretch

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Medicine definitions for tenia

tenia

[tēnē-ə]

n.

Variant oftaenia

taenia

n. pl tae•ni•as

A ribbonlike band of tissue or muscle.
A flatworm of the genus Taenia, which includes many tapeworms. Not in technical use.

Taenia

[tēnē-ə]

n.

A genus of cestodes that formerly included most of the tapeworms but is now restricted to those species infecting carnivores with a cysticercus.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.