testament

[ tes-tuh-muh nt ]
/ ˈtɛs tə mənt /

noun

Law.
  1. a will, especially one that relates to the disposition of one's personal property.
  2. will2(def 8).
either of the two major portions of the Bible: the Mosaic or old covenant or dispensation, or the Christian or new covenant or dispensation.
(initial capital letter) the New Testament, as distinct from the Old Testament.
(initial capital letter) a copy of the New Testament.
a covenant, especially between God and humans.

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Origin of testament

1250–1300; Middle English: will, covenant < Latin testāmentum, equivalent to testā(rī) to bear witness (see testate) + -mentum -ment
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2020

Example sentences from the Web for testament

British Dictionary definitions for testament (1 of 2)

testament
/ (ˈtɛstəmənt) /

noun

law a will setting out the disposition of personal property (esp in the phrase last will and testament)
a proof, attestation, or tributehis success was a testament to his skills
  1. a covenant instituted between God and man, esp the covenant of Moses or that instituted by Christ
  2. a copy of either the Old or the New Testament, or of the complete Bible

Derived forms of testament

testamental, adjective

Word Origin for testament

C14: from Latin: a will, from testārī to bear witness, from testis a witness

British Dictionary definitions for testament (2 of 2)

Testament
/ (ˈtɛstəmənt) /

noun

either of the two main parts of the Bible; the Old Testament or the New Testament
the New Testament as distinct from the Old
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012