Dictionary.com

best-laid plans go astray, the

Save This Word!

Also, the best-laid schemes go astray. Even very careful designs or projects do not always succeed. For example, Mary spent all afternoon preparing this elaborate dish but forgot the most important ingredient—oh well, the best-laid plans go astray. This particular turn of phrase comes from Robert Burns's poem “To a Mouse” (1786): “The best-laid schemes o' mice an' men gang aft a-gley [go often astray].” It is so well known that it is often abbreviated to the best-laid plans.

QUIZ
SHALL WE PLAY A "SHALL" VS. "SHOULD" CHALLENGE?
Should you take this quiz on “shall” versus “should”? It should prove to be a quick challenge!
Question 1 of 6
Which form is used to state an obligation or duty someone has?
The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.

How to use best-laid plans go astray, the in a sentence

FEEDBACK