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The reports of my death are greatly exaggerated

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The text of a cable sent by Mark Twain from London to the press in the United States after his obituary had been mistakenly published.

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The New Dictionary of Cultural Literacy, Third Edition Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

MORE ABOUT THE REPORTS OF MY DEATH ARE GREATLY EXAGGERATED

What does The reports of my death are greatly exaggerated mean?

The reports of my death are greatly exaggerated is a popular misquote attributed to author Samuel Clemens, known by his pen name, Mark Twain. The humorous quote is based on a letter Twain sent to a newspaper reporter who had asked Twain about rumors that he was dying.

Although it’s not an accurate quote, The reports of my death are greatly exaggerated remains associated with Twain. Twain was known for his humor, which the quote perfectly represents. Often, this quote is brought up to praise Twain’s skill as a humorist.

The reports of my death are greatly exaggerated is often used to humorously comment on a person’s absence from society or to refer to something that appears dead or hopeless but still has a slim chance of success.

Where does The reports of my death are greatly exaggerated come from?

In May 1897, there was a rumor among journalists that author Mark Twain was either dead or dying of a serious illness. Looking for confirmation, journalist Frank Marshall White of the New York Journal contacted Twain to see if there was any truth to the rumors. Twain responded to White with a letter in which he humorously said “The report of my death was an exaggeration.” In classic Twain fashion, the author jokingly expressed more offense with the rumors that he was poor than the rumors of his death.

The popular misquote of Twain’s words seems to come from a biography written by Albert Paine in the early 1900s. In the biography, Paine alters the incident so that Twain speaks to an unnamed reporter in person and humorously tells him that “The report of my death has been grossly exaggerated.” This misquote then changed overtime to use the word greatly instead of grossly.

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How is The reports of my death are greatly exaggerated used in real life?

The reports of my death are greatly exaggerated is a popular misquote attributed to Mark Twain and is often used to praise clever sense of humor.

Try using The reports of my death are greatly exaggerated!

The reports of my death are greatly exaggerated is a humorous quote attributed to:

A. Edgar Allen Poe
B. Mark Twain
C. Charles Dickens
D. Ernest Hemingway

How to use The reports of my death are greatly exaggerated in a sentence

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