thrum

1
[ thruhm ]
See synonyms for: thrumthrummedthrumming on Thesaurus.com

verb (used without object),thrummed, thrum·ming.
  1. to play on a stringed instrument, as a guitar, by plucking the strings, especially in an idle, monotonous, or unskillful manner; strum.

  2. to sound when thrummed on, as a guitar or similar stringed instrument.

  1. to drum or tap idly with the fingers.

verb (used with object),thrummed, thrum·ming.
  1. to play (a stringed instrument, or a melody on it) by plucking the strings, especially in an idle, monotonous, or unskillful manner; strum.

  2. to drum or tap idly on.

  1. to recite or tell in a monotonous way.

noun
  1. an act or sound of thrumming; dull, monotonous sound.

Origin of thrum

1
First recorded in 1545–55; imitative

Other words from thrum

  • thrummer, noun

Words Nearby thrum

Other definitions for thrum (2 of 2)

thrum2
[ thruhm ]

noun
  1. one of the ends of the warp threads in a loom, left unwoven and remaining attached to the loom when the web is cut off.

  2. thrums, the row or fringe of such threads.

  1. any short piece of waste thread or yarn; tuft, tassel, or fringe of threads, as at the edge of a piece of cloth.

  2. Often thrums .Nautical. short bits of rope yarn used for making mats.

verb (used with object),thrummed, thrum·ming.
  1. Nautical. to insert short pieces of rope yarn through (canvas) and thus give it a rough surface, as for wrapping about a part to prevent chafing.

  2. to furnish or cover with thrums, ends of thread, or tufts.

Origin of thrum

2
First recorded before 1000; Middle English noun thrum, thrum(m)e, “end-piece (from the warp of a loom)”, Old English -thrum (in tungethrum “ligament of the tongue”), cognate with Old High German drum “end-piece”; akin to Old Norse thrǫmr “brim, edge, verge,” Latin terminus, Greek térma “end”

Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2024

How to use thrum in a sentence

  • Fusing R&B sounds with electro-pop production throws songs into a softer focus, and her vocals are often layered over the thrum of a steady bass or drum as she whispers about the inner dimensions and complexity of love and adolescence.

    The best things to do in the D.C. area the week of Nov. 4-10 | Fritz Hahn, Anying Guo, Chris Richards, Haben Kelati | November 4, 2021 | Washington Post
  • Work can kill your soul, but the stories in this collection thrum with life.

    Great Weekend Reads | The Daily Beast | July 3, 2011 | THE DAILY BEAST
  • They had not heard the thrum of the motors on the roadway outside.

    The Ghost Breaker | Charles Goddard
  • Dee could thrum out an accompaniment, if it happened to be a very simple one with only one or two changes.

  • When he touches Rossetti's lute his melody is blurred by the thrum of the strings that the Italian's fingers have so lately left.

    Oscar Wilde | Arthur Ransome
  • Stella looked and listened until there was but a faint thrum far up the lake.

    Big Timber | Bertrand W. Sinclair
  • Some thrum a musical instrument the livelong day, and, when they wake at night, proceed at once to their musical performance.

British Dictionary definitions for thrum (1 of 2)

thrum1

/ (θrʌm) /


verbthrums, thrumming or thrummed
  1. to strum rhythmically but without expression on (a musical instrument)

  2. (intr) to drum incessantly: rain thrummed on the roof

  1. to repeat (something) monotonously

noun
  1. a repetitive strumming or recitation

Origin of thrum

1
C16: of imitative origin

Derived forms of thrum

  • thrummer, noun

British Dictionary definitions for thrum (2 of 2)

thrum2

/ (θrʌm) textiles /


noun
    • any of the unwoven ends of warp thread remaining on the loom when the web has been removed

    • such ends of thread collectively

  1. a fringe or tassel of short unwoven threads

verbthrums, thrumming or thrummed
  1. (tr) to trim with thrums

Origin of thrum

2
C14: from Old English; related to Old High German drum remnant, Dutch dreum

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012