tinned

[ tind ]
/ tɪnd /
|

adjective

coated or plated with tin.
Chiefly British. preserved or packed in a can; canned.

Nearby words

  1. tinkertoy,
  2. tinkle,
  3. tinkly,
  4. tinley park,
  5. tinman,
  6. tinner,
  7. tinnery,
  8. tinnevelly,
  9. tinnevelly senna,
  10. tinnient

Origin of tinned

Middle English word dating back to 1350–1400; see origin at tin, -ed2, -ed3

Related formsun·tinned, adjective

tin

[ tin ]
/ tɪn /

noun

adjective

verb (used with object), tinned, tin·ning.

Origin of tin

before 900; (noun) Middle English, Old English; cognate with Dutch, Old Norse tin, German Zinn; (v.) Middle English tinnen, derivative of the noun

Related formstin·like, adjectivere·tin, verb (used with object), re·tinned, re·tin·ning.

Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for tinned


British Dictionary definitions for tinned

tinned

/ (tɪnd) /

adjective

plated, coated, or treated with tin
mainly British preserved or stored in airtight tinstinned soup
coated with a layer of solder

tin

/ (tɪn) /

noun

verb tins, tinning or tinned (tr)

Derived Formstinlike, adjective

Word Origin for tin

Old English; related to Old Norse tin, Old High German zin

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for tinned

tin

n.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper

Medicine definitions for tinned

tin

[ tĭn ]

n. Symbol Sn

A malleable metallic element used to coat other metals to prevent corrosion. Atomic number 50.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.

Science definitions for tinned

tin

[ tĭn ]

Sn

A malleable, silvery metallic element that occurs in igneous rocks. It has a crystalline structure and crackles when bent. Tin is used as an anticorrosion agent and is a part of numerous alloys, including bronze. Atomic number 50; atomic weight 118.71; melting point 231.89°C; boiling point 2,270°C; specific gravity 7.31; valence 2, 4. See Periodic Table. See Note at element.
The American Heritage® Science Dictionary Copyright © 2011. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.