initiate

[verb ih-nish-ee-eyt; adjective, noun ih-nish-ee-it, -eyt]

verb (used with object), in·i·ti·at·ed, in·i·ti·at·ing.

adjective

noun

a person who has been initiated.

Origin of initiate

1595–1605; < Latin initiātus past participle of initiāre, equivalent to initi(um) (see initial) + -ātus -ate1
Related formsin·i·ti·a·tor, nounnon·in·i·ti·ate, nounpre·in·i·ti·ate, verb (used with object), pre·in·i·ti·at·ed, pre·in·i·ti·at·ing.pre·in·i·ti·ate, nounqua·si-in·i·ti·at·ed, adjectivere·in·i·ti·ate, verb (used with object), re·in·i·ti·at·ed, re·in·i·ti·at·ing.un·in·i·ti·ate, adjectiveun·in·i·ti·at·ed, adjectivewell-in·i·ti·at·ed, adjective

Synonyms for initiate

Synonym study

1. See begin.

Antonyms for initiate

Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019


Examples from the Web for uninitiated

Contemporary Examples of uninitiated

Historical Examples of uninitiated

  • He does not make it quite plain to the uninitiated as to how this is to be done.

    The Arena

    Various

  • It is difficult for the uninitiated to arrive at the esoteric meaning of these writings.

  • It was bone-black, which cannot be told from lamp-black or soot by the uninitiated.

    The Ambulance Made Two Trips

    William Fitzgerald Jenkins

  • There was no greater crime than the "betrayal" of secrets to the uninitiated.

  • The future is veiled and sealed to the uninitiated; it is unsealed in initiation.


British Dictionary definitions for uninitiated

uninitiated

adjective

  1. not having gained knowledge or experience of a particular subject or activity
  2. (as collective noun; preceded by the)the uninitiated

initiate

verb (ɪˈnɪʃɪˌeɪt) (tr)

to begin or originate
to accept (new members) into an organization such as a club, through often secret ceremonies
to teach fundamentals toshe initiated him into the ballet

adjective (ɪˈnɪʃɪɪt, -ˌeɪt)

initiated; begun

noun (ɪˈnɪʃɪɪt, -ˌeɪt)

a person who has been initiated, esp recently
a beginner; novice

Word Origin for initiate

C17: from Latin initiāre (vb), from initium; see initial
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for uninitiated
adj.

1670s, from un- (1) "not" + past participle of initiate (v.).

initiate

n.

"one who has been initiated," 1811, from past participle adjective initiate (c.1600); see initiate (v.).

initiate

v.

c.1600, "introduce to some practice or system," also "begin, set going," from Latin initiatus, past participle of initiare "to begin, originate," from initium "beginning" (see initial). In some senses a back-formation from initiation. Related: Initiated; initiates; initiating; initiator.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper