invite

[verb in-vahyt; noun in-vahyt]
See more synonyms for invite on Thesaurus.com
verb (used with object), in·vit·ed, in·vit·ing.
  1. to request the presence or participation of in a kindly, courteous, or complimentary way, especially to request to come or go to some place, gathering, entertainment, etc., or to do something: to invite friends to dinner.
  2. to request politely or formally: to invite donations.
  3. to act so as to bring on or render probable: to invite accidents by fast driving.
  4. to call forth or give occasion for: Those big shoes invite laughter.
  5. to attract, allure, entice, or tempt.
verb (used without object), in·vit·ed, in·vit·ing.
  1. to give invitation; offer attractions or allurements.
noun
  1. Informal. an invitation.

Origin of invite

First recorded in 1525–35, invite is from the Latin word invītāre
Related formsin·vi·tee [in-vi-tee, -vahy-] /ˌɪn vɪˈti, -vaɪ-/, nounin·vit·er, in·vi·tor, nounpre·in·vite, verb (used with object), pre·in·vit·ed, pre·in·vit·ing.qua·si-in·vit·ed, adjectivere·in·vite, verb, re·in·vit·ed, re·in·vit·ing.self-in·vit·ed, adjectiveun·in·vit·ed, adjective

Synonyms for invite

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1. bid. 2. solicit. 5. lure, draw.

Synonym study

1. See call.
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018


Examples from the Web for uninvited

Contemporary Examples of uninvited

Historical Examples of uninvited

  • But the newest visitor did not come, like the others, uninvited into the "private" room.

    Shavings

    Joseph C. Lincoln

  • Many of those who joined in it, uninvited, we did not even know.

    My Reminiscences

    Rabindranath Tagore

  • It was the uninvited visitor whom he had met in the plantation.

    The Green Rust

    Edgar Wallace

  • Then quite privately and uninvited, Jemmy Three began to think.

    Judith Lynn

    Annie Hamilton Donnell

  • All these cogitations because a woman had entered his life 223 uninvited!

    The Pagan Madonna

    Harold MacGrath


British Dictionary definitions for uninvited

uninvited

adjective
  1. not having been inviteduninvited guests

invite

verb (ɪnˈvaɪt) (tr)
  1. to ask (a person or persons) in a friendly or polite way (to do something, attend an event, etc)he invited them to dinner
  2. to make a request for, esp publicly or formallyto invite applications
  3. to bring on or provoke; give occasion foryou invite disaster by your actions
  4. to welcome or tempt
noun (ˈɪnvaɪt)
  1. an informal word for invitation
Derived Formsinviter, noun

Word Origin for invite

C16: from Latin invītāre to invite, entertain, from in- ² + -vītāre, probably related to Greek hiesthai to be desirous of
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for uninvited
adj.

1630s, from un- (1) "not" + past participle of invite (v.).

invite

v.

1530s, a back-formation from invitation, or else from Middle French inviter (5c.), from Latin invitare. As a noun variant of invitation it is attested from 1650s. Related: Invited; inviting.

invite

n.

1650s, from invite (v.).

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper