ute

[yoot]

Origin of ute

First recorded in 1940–45

Ute

[yoot]
noun, plural Utes, (especially collectively) Ute.
  1. a member of an American Indian people of Utah and W Colorado.
  2. a dialect or group of dialects of the Uto-Aztecan language shared by the Utes and Southern Paiutes.
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018

Examples from the Web for ute

Historical Examples of ute

  • Matt said his mother was a Ute—full-blooded en tribe-raised.

    David Lannarck, Midget

    George S. Harney

  • The Ute had discovered the flight of their captive and were in hot pursuit.

  • There was danger in their path; a Ute war-band was abroad, but the fools knew it not.

    The Candidate

    Joseph Alexander Altsheler

  • On the whole, I must say, we were not favorably impressed with Ute life, as a rule.

    Across America

    James F. Rusling

  • They must have been attacked by wild animals or kidnapped by that Ute Indian.


British Dictionary definitions for ute

ute

noun
  1. Australian and NZ informal short for utility (def. 6)

Ute

noun
  1. plural Utes or Ute a member of a North American Indian people of Utah, Colorado, and New Mexico, related to the Aztecs
  2. the language of this people, belonging to the Shoshonean subfamily of the Uto-Aztecan family
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for ute

Ute

1846, shortened from Utah.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper