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vanity

[ van-i-tee ]
/ ˈvæn ɪ ti /
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noun, plural van·i·ties.
adjective
produced as a showcase for one's own talents, especially as a writer, actor, singer, or composer: surprisingly entertaining for a vanity production.
of, relating to, or issued by a vanity press: a spate of vanity books.
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Origin of vanity

First recorded in 1200–50; Middle English vanite from Old French vanité from Latin vānitās, equivalent to vān- (see vain) + -itās -ity

synonym study for vanity

1. See pride.

OTHER WORDS FROM vanity

van·i·tied, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2021

How to use vanity in a sentence

British Dictionary definitions for vanity

vanity
/ (ˈvænɪtɪ) /

noun plural -ties
the state or quality of being vain; excessive pride or conceit
ostentation occasioned by ambition or pride
an instance of being vain or something about which one is vain
the state or quality of being valueless, futile, or unreal
something that is worthless or useless
NZ short for vanity unit

Word Origin for vanity

C13: from Old French vanité, from Latin vānitās emptiness, from vānus empty
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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