ventilate

[ven-tl-eyt]

verb (used with object), ven·ti·lat·ed, ven·ti·lat·ing.

verb (used without object), ven·ti·lat·ed, ven·ti·lat·ing.

to give utterance or expression to one's emotions, opinions, complaints, etc.

RELATED WORDS


Origin of ventilate

1400–50; late Middle English ventilatten to blow (something) away < Latin ventilātus (past participle of ventilāre to fan), equivalent to vent(us) wind1 + -il- v. suffix (variant of -ul-, orig. after derivatives of nouns ending in -ulus -ule; cf. speculate) + -ātus -ate1
Related formsven·ti·la·ble, adjectiveo·ver·ven·ti·late, verb (used with object), o·ver·ven·ti·lat·ed, o·ver·ven·ti·lat·ing.re·ven·ti·late, verb (used with object), re·ven·ti·lat·ed, re·ven·ti·lat·ing.self-ven·ti·lat·ed, adjectiveun·der·ven·ti·late, verb (used with object), un·der·ven·ti·lat·ed, un·der·ven·ti·lat·ing.un·der·ven·ti·lat·ed, adjectiveun·ven·ti·lat·ed, adjectivewell-ven·ti·lat·ed, adjective

Synonyms for ventilate

Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for ventilated

Contemporary Examples of ventilated

Historical Examples of ventilated

  • I am sorry you did not, for it would have brought to light some things which have not yet been ventilated.

    Down South

    Oliver Optic

  • The building is lighted, heated, and ventilated in the most modern fashion.

    The New Education

    Scott Nearing

  • But does that go to show that a question should not be ventilated?

    Orley Farm

    Anthony Trollope

  • The shack is ventilated by a chimney hole in the roof as shown by Fig. 146.

  • I believe a house should be ventilated to the bottom instead of the top.



British Dictionary definitions for ventilated

ventilate

verb (tr)

to drive foul air out of (an enclosed area)
to provide with a means of airing
to expose (a question, grievance, etc) to public examination or discussion
physiol to oxygenate (the blood) in the capillaries of the lungs
to winnow (grain)
Derived Formsventilable, adjective

Word Origin for ventilate

C15: from Latin ventilāre to fan, from ventulus diminutive of ventus wind
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for ventilated

ventilate

v.

mid-15c., "to blow away something" (of wind), from Latin ventilatus, past participle of ventilare "to brandish, toss in the air, winnow, fan, agitate, set in motion," from ventulus "a breeze," diminutive of ventus "wind" (see wind (n.1)). Original notion is of cleaning grain by tossing it in the air and letting the wind blow away the chaff. Meaning "supply a room with fresh air" first recorded 1660s (implied in ventilation). Slang sense of "shoot" (someone) is recorded from 1875. Related: Ventilated; ventilating.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper