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vulture

[ vuhl-cher ]
/ ˈvʌl tʃər /
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noun
any of several large, primarily carrion-eating Old World birds of prey of the family Accipitridae, often having a naked head and less powerful feet than those of the related hawks and eagles.
any of several superficially similar New World birds of the family Cathartidae, as the turkey vulture.
a person or thing that preys, especially greedily or unscrupulously: That vulture would sell out his best friend.

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Origin of vulture

1325–75; Middle English <Latin vultur

OTHER WORDS FROM vulture

vul·ture·like, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2022

How to use vulture in a sentence

British Dictionary definitions for vulture

vulture
/ (ˈvʌltʃə) /

noun
any of various very large diurnal birds of prey of the genera Neophron, Gyps, Gypaetus, etc, of Africa, Asia, and warm parts of Europe, typically having broad wings and soaring flight and feeding on carrion: family Accipitridae (hawks)See also griffon 1 (def. 2), lammergeier
any similar bird of the family Cathartidae of North, Central, and South AmericaSee also condor, turkey buzzard
a person or thing that preys greedily and ruthlessly on others, esp the helpless

Derived forms of vulture

vulture-like, adjective

Word Origin for vulture

C14: from Old French voltour, from Latin vultur; perhaps related to Latin vellere to pluck, tear
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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