Williams

[wil-yuh mz]
|

noun


William

[wil-yuh m]

noun

a word formerly used in communications to represent the letter W.
a male given name: from Germanic words meaning “will” and “helmet.”
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for williams

Contemporary Examples of williams

Historical Examples of williams

  • Williams, Gunby, and Howard, all strove in vain to bring it to order.

  • Williams was on the point of replying when Mr. Sanders entered.

    Life in London

    Edwin Hodder

  • Williams and Lawson had, as Hardy predicted, been a source of great annoyance to George.

    Life in London

    Edwin Hodder

  • I went, as usual, but Mr. Williams was there himself, so I came back at once.

    The Channings

    Mrs. Henry Wood

  • Seated at it was Mr. Williams; and a few words of explanation ensued.

    The Channings

    Mrs. Henry Wood


British Dictionary definitions for williams

Williams

noun

Hank, real name Hiram Williams. 1923–53, US country singer and songwriter. His songs (all 1948–52) include "Jambalaya", "Your Cheatin' Heart", and "Why Don't you Love me (like you Used to Do?)"
John. born 1941, Australian classical guitarist, living in Britain
John (Towner). born 1932, US composer of film music; his scores include those for Jaws (1975), Star Wars (1977), E.T. (1982), Schindler's List (1993), Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone (2001), and Memoirs of a Geisha (2005)
Ralph Vaughan. See (Ralph) Vaughan Williams
Raymond (Henry). 1921–88, British literary critic and novelist, noted esp for such works as Culture and Society (1958) and The Long Revolution (1961), which offer a socialist analysis of the relationship between society and culture
Robbie, full name Robert Peter Williams. born 1974, British pop singer and songwriter. A member of Take That (1990–95; and from 2010), he found solo success with "Angels" (1997) and the albums Life Thru a Lens (1997), Swing When You're Winning (2001), and Escapology (2002)
Robin (McLaurim). born 1951, US film actor and comedian; films include Good Morning, Vietnam (1987), Dead Poets' Society (1989), Mrs Doubtfire (1993), and Insomnia (2002)
Rowan (Douglas). Baron. born 1950, Archbishop of Canterbury (2002–2012); Archbishop of Wales (2000–02)
Serena . born 1981, US tennis player, sister of Venus Williams: since 1999 she has won sixteen Grand Slam singles titles, including the Australian Open five times, Wimbledon five times, and the US Open four times
Tennessee, real name Thomas Lanier Williams. 1911–83, US dramatist. His plays include The Glass Menagerie (1944), A Streetcar Named Desire (1947), Cat on a Hot Tin Roof (1955), and Night of the Iguana (1961)
Venus . born 1980, US tennis player: winner of seven Grand Slam singles titles, including Wimbledon five times (2000–01, 2005, 2007–08); with her sister Serena she has won thirteen Grand Slam doubles titles
William Carlos (ˈkɑːləs). 1883–1963, US poet, who formulated the poetic concept "no ideas but in things". His works include Paterson (1946–58), which explores the daily life of a man living in a modern city, and the prose work In the American Grain (1925)

William

noun

known as William the Lion. ?1143–1214, king of Scotland (1165–1214)
Prince. born 1982, Duke of Cambridge, first son of Prince Charles and Diana, Princess of Wales. In 2011 he married Kate Middleton (born 1982); their son, Prince George, was born in 2013
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for williams

William

masc. proper name, from Old North French Willaume, Norman form of French Guillaume, of Germanic origin (cf. Old High German Willahelm), from willio "will" + helma "helmet." After the Conquest, the most popular given name in England until supplanted by John.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper