workup

[ wurk-uhp ]
/ ˈwɜrkˌʌp /

noun

a thorough medical diagnostic examination including laboratory tests and x-rays.
a tentative plan or proposal.

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Origin of workup

First recorded in 1935–40; noun use of verb phrase work up

Definition for workup (2 of 2)

work-up
[ wurk-uhp ]
/ ˈwɜrkˌʌp /

noun Printing.

an undesirable deposit of ink on a surface being printed, caused by the forcing into type-high position of quads or other spacing material.

Origin of work-up

noun use of verb phrase work up
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2020

British Dictionary definitions for workup

work up

verb (tr, mainly adverb)

to arouse the feelings of; excite
to cause to grow or developto work up a hunger
(also preposition) to move or cause to move gradually upwards
to manipulate or mix into a specified object or shape
to gain knowledge of or skill at (a subject)
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Medical definitions for workup

workup
[ wûrkŭp′ ]

n.

A thorough medical examination for diagnostic purposes.
The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.

Idioms and Phrases with workup

work up

1

Arouse emotions; see worked up.

2

Increase one's skill, status, or responsibility through effort, as in He worked up to 30 sit-ups a day, or She worked up to bank manager. Also see work one's way. [Second half of 1600s]

3

Intensify gradually, as in The film worked up to a thrilling climax. [Second half of 1600s]

4

Develop or produce by effort, as in Swimming always works up an appetite. [Second half of 1600s]

The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.