Archives

  1. CNN: What Dictionary.com’s words of the year say about us

    Dictionary.com’s word of the year for 2018 is misinformation. Its word last year was complicit. The year before that? Xenophobia.

  2. Washington Post: Word of the year: misinformation. Here’s why.

    The word of the year, according to Dictionary.com, is misinformation.

  3. Fast Company: Why Dictionary.com chose “misinformation,” not “disinformation” as word of the year

    Dictionary.com’s choice for word of the year has become every bit as much of a bellwether as Time magazine’s person of the year. And this year–more so than in years past in my opinion–the editors at Dictionary.com nailed it with their choice of “misinformation.”

  4. Teen Vogue: Dictionary.com Names “Misinformation” Word of the Year 2018

    For the past two years, Dictionary.com has been closely examining the dialogue that has infiltrated our culture. In 2016, its word of the year was “xenophobia”; in 2017, it was “complicit.” This year’s word of the year is another one that keeps popping up: “misinformation.”

  5. LA Times: ‘Misinformation’ is Dictionary.com’s word of the year. Would we lie to you?

    Dictionary.com has named “misinformation” its 2018 word of the year, and that’s not fake news.

  6. AP: Dictionary.com chooses ‘misinformation’ as word of the year

    Misinformation, as opposed to disinformation, was chosen Monday as Dictionary.com’s word of the year on the tattered coattails of “toxic,” picked earlier this month…

  7. Medium: Interview with the CEO of Dictionary.com, Elizabeth McMillan

    With Dictionary.com, Elizabeth McMillan has helped to create a company that stands out amongst other companies in similar spheres and has helped shape it into the modern and relevant company it is today.

  8. Fast Company: How Dictionary.com’s Twitter account got so cleverly woke

    The website’s Twitter account now goes far beyond vocabulary-building blasts, seizing instead on words embedded in the public discourse–and expounding on not only their meaning but the intent behind them.

  9. Gizmodo: Dictionary.com Is Very Tired of Your Thirsty Attempts to Get in the Dictionary

    The Dictionary.com team would really like misguided or trolling internet users to stop asking them to add new words to the online dictionary.

  10. MSN: Dictionary.com savagely trolls Virginia football with help of a dad joke

    If you follow Dictionary.com on Twitter, you know jokes, puns and zingers are pretty on brand for the sassy and socially conscious account. And it recently delivered a great one-liner, combining college football with a dad joke pun and a harsh shot at Virginia’s football team.

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