Posts by Candice Bradley

  1. “Daylight Savings Time” And Commonly Mixed-Up Words And Phrases

    Every March and November, most Americans change their clocks to keep up with the switch into or out of daylight-saving time. This practice of advancing the clocks ahead an hour is called daylight-saving time. But, because daylight savings time is used so frequently, the term is also considered acceptable. Daylight-saving time means that since the clock is moved ahead one hour, you get one more …

  2. How Well Do You Know Your Favorite Coffees?

    Are you a coffee connoisseur? Test your java knowledge with this quiz about coffee types. Maybe you even know more than your favorite barista.

  3. Are These Words Already Part Of Your Vocabulary?

    July 22–July 28, 2019 To prevent future abusage, learn some new vocabulary with this week’s Word of the Day Quiz! Don’t forget to tell us your favorite word from this week and share it with your friends on Facebook and Twitter!

  4. Test Your Vocab With This Word Of The Day Quiz!

    July 15–July 21, 2019 There’s no remora here … this Word of the Day quiz is up and ready for ya.   It’s time to elevate your vocabulary. Ready? Go!   Don’t forget to tell us your favorite word from this week and share it with your friends on Facebook and Twitter!

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    “Flammable” vs. “Inflammable”

    English is a trickster of a language, evidenced by the fact that two words that appear to be antonyms can actually mean the exact same thing. However, every once in a while we come across a pair of words that it really would be better to not confuse. A fine example of this is flammable and inflammable. Why are these two words so confusing? Well, flammable and …

  6. Redefine Black: Why Dictionary.com Is Updating Its Definition

    Update: Dictionary.com lexicographers have completed updates of our current entry for the word Black. Read on to find out why we’ve decided to revise this particular entry. At Dictionary.com we take words very seriously. They are foundational to how individuals think about themselves, and they can influence the perceptions of others. When it comes to the language of identity, the words we use are especially important. …

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    Why Is “Bisexual” Such A Charged Word?

    by Rory GoryBisexual people make up 52 percent of the lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB) community, but in recent years, the words to describe the identity of someone who is attracted to more than one gender have become increasingly complex. As the conversation around gender identity has expanded, so, too, has the language to describe both gender and sexuality as well as the complex interaction …

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    Happy Memorial Day: Is There A Better Way To Say It?

    There are plenty of joyous holidays that appropriately get celebrated by wishing someone a happy day. The Fourth of July, Hanukkah, Easter, Thanksgiving … each a holiday celebrating jubilation over specific events, be they religious or historic. But, what about holidays based on serious reverence or an acknowledgement of a struggle? There’s certainly a lot of discussion surrounding the act of wishing someone a “Happy …

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    “Infamous” vs. “Notorious”: Why Is There A Difference?

    Thanks to clicks, likes, and verified blue checkmarks, a person’s reputation can extend far beyond those who know them personally. For example, it’s widely known that Chris Evans is a real-life Captain America who holds doors open for people, and we all acknowledge that Beyoncé is a goddess among us mere mortals. Some people, though, have a reputation that precedes them in less positive ways. …

  10. Nazi vs. Fascist: Is There Really A Difference?

    Linguists have a bunch of fancy words to describe language evolution. When a word’s meaning becomes more negative over time, it’s referred to as pejoration. The opposite–when a meaning is viewed in a more positive light over time–is called melioration.Word evolution like this is pretty common; some words even manage to go through both pejoration and melioration. Two such words that have managed to see-saw like this …

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