Posts by Lauren Gordon

  1. How To Ask The Right Questions

    Real talk? Dealing with people can be … exhausting. Of course it can also be beautiful, rewarding, and joyous, but when you’re looking for answers, it can be tiring trying to get a full and complete one. Maybe there’s a master evader in your life (a teenager, perhaps?), or maybe it’s your job to pin down a certain, er, politician, who has a problem with …

  2. “Amicable” vs. “Amiable”

    The words amicable and amiable are sort of like fraternal twins. They certainly have a lot in common, but upon a closer look, there are differences that truly set them apart. Admittedly though, spotting the differences between amicable and amiableĀ even gave us pause. First, they practically look the same and sound the same, so it is easy to understand how one could mix them up. …

  3. “Latitude” vs. “Longitude”

    Was the thought of identifying latitude and longitude on a map in geography class one of your high-key stressors? Well, you’re not the only anxiety-ridden test taker out there! The concept of measuring Earth by coordinates isn’t an overwhelmingly hard concept to grasp, but identifying the difference between these two words can be a little tough. Since they are both units of measurement that help …

  4. “Ambiguous” vs. “Ambivalent”

    Just like people assume family members are inherently similar because they are related, people assume the same things about words: if they have similar spellings and soundings, they must be alike. As it is with people, the similarities between some related words that look and sound the same end there. Take ambiguous and ambivalent for example. They share the Latin prefix ambi-, which means “both,” …

  5. Wary vs. Weary: How To Tell Them Apart

    Wary and weary are words that make us do a verbal double take. Have you ever started out saying “I was wary of the situation,” pause, and think: “Wait, or was I weary of the situation?” We have! There are several factors that contribute to the confusion between these two words. For one, both are adjectives often used to describe one’s feelings. For two, they …