Posts by Mariel Jungkunz

  1. What Is The Difference Between “Equality” And “Equity”?

    Children are often concerned with issues of fairness: who has more, who was first, and who is best. That’s not fair, they clamor at the first hint of any sort of inequality. Of course, some concepts related to equality can be difficult for children to grasp—but many of these concepts continue to pose thorny problems for us as adults making and enforcing policies and laws. …

  2. “Marketing” vs. “Advertising”: What’s The Difference?

    We’re pretty sure we don’t have to point it out: advertising is everywhere. Your social media, internet, and email inbox are full of ads—and that’s because you are a consumer and therefore a target for marketing campaigns for everything from soft drinks to cars. Sometimes it’s hard to decipher what’s an ad and what’s not. From the influx of emails from retailers to the influencers …

  3. Alternative Ways To Ask “How Are You?”

    We often ask “How are you?” without even thinking. It just automatically follows “Hello” or whatever greeting we have chosen to open with. This is not a new habit. In the 1300s, we started asking each other “how do,” while adding a pronoun or name. This continued through the 16th and 17th centuries: How do ye to day? How doth my lady? How dost thou? …

  4. “Emotional Support Animal” vs. “Therapy Animal” vs. “Service Animal”: The Differences Matter

    This September, we released our biggest update to the dictionary ever. Our dictionary editors touched over 15,000 entries in a sweeping effort to reflect the many ways language is evolving. From capitalizing Black to adding a separate entry for Pride to revising references to suicide, our update addresses topics that touch us on some of our most personal levels: race and ethnicity, gender and sexuality, …

  5. “Street Art” vs. “Graffiti”: What’s The Difference?

    Now more than ever before, public art is on the rise. New murals crop up in cities, large and small, on what feels like an everyday basis, each one breathing new, vibrant life into the streets that were once blank canvases for creativity. The terms graffiti and street art have long been used interchangeably to describe these public art installations—but what should we really call …

  6. What Does “Craft Beer” Actually Mean?

    by Alyssa Pereira Not all beers are made equal. That much is made apparent in a walk through any local market anywhere in the US. The majority of beer sections in American grocery stores and neighborhood bodegas aren’t exactly artisan creations. Rather, they’re mass-produced, packaged, and sold by one of just a few international beverage conglomerates. But alongside them, if you look carefully, you’ll often …

  7. “Barbecuing,” “Grilling,” And “Smoking”: What’s The Difference?

    Every year as the weather heats up, grills are dusted off and meats and vegetables are thrown on the fire. To those in the West and many northern cities, this is barbecuing. Just don’t call it that in the South or parts of the Midwest like Kansas City, Mo., because in certain regions, not everything cooked on a grill is called barbecue. The word barbecue means different …

  8. Why Do We Have “Red States” And “Blue States”?

    If you’ve watched (or even tried to avoid) the news as a presidential election heats up, you’re probably well aware that political pundits like to use the color red to represent the Republican Party and blue for the Democratic Party. A “red state” votes Republican in presidential elections and Senate races, while a “blue state” leans Democratic. No matter which news program you favor, they …

  9. 3 Ways To Sound Assertive (Instead Of Passive-Aggressive)

    How’s this for an email? Well, I guess I have time to tell you about passive-aggressive writing …. It’s short notice, and as I mentioned in my previous email, I’ve been extremely busy lately. But it’s no big deal. Clearly, this is more important for you … Thanks. Reading this probably had you rolling your eyes and made your skin crawl. The email takes a …

  10. Better Words To Use Instead Of “Psycho”

    Psycho, when used as a noun, refers to “a crazy or mentally unstable person.” As an adjective, it describes a subject that’s “psychopathic or psychotic.” In fact, the word was first recorded in the 1930s as an abbreviated form of the terms psychological or psychotic. Since then, psycho has developed into one of pop culture’s favorite words to conjure up images of menacing killers and monsters that …

  11. 5 Kind Ways To Say “No” To Family

    Having trouble saying no to mom and other loved ones? Are you one of those people who finds it harder to say no to friends and family than your employer? If you are, you may be looking for a few tips on how to say no without damaging important relationships. After all, your boss is probably less likely to take your refusal personally.  The key to saying …