Mixed-up Meanings

  1. Wary vs. Weary: How To Tell Them Apart

    Wary and weary are words that make us do a verbal double take. Have you ever started out saying “I was wary of the situation,” pause, and think: “Wait, or was I weary of the situation?” We have! There are several factors that contribute to the confusion between these two words. For one, both are adjectives often used to describe one’s feelings. For two, they …

  2. Wise Up To The Difference Between “Knowledge” vs. “Wisdom”

    Is it better to have wisdom or knowledge? Can you have one without the other? And which comes first? If you’ve ever searched for acumen into these two brainy terms, we’re here to help break them down.  Wisdom and knowledge have quite a bit in common. Both words are primarily used as nouns that are related to learning. They’re listed as synonyms for one another …

  3. What Is The Difference Between “Yea” vs. “Yeah”?

    Yeah … these two words seem the same but which one should you use? Yea vs. yeah Yea can be used as an informal adverb meaning “yes” or “to affirm,” or as a noun to indicate an affirmative vote. When used in a vote, yea can be pronounced like “yay.” Yea can also be used as an adverb to amplify an adjective or to say …

  4. “Your” vs. “You’re”: How To Choose The Right Word

    Did you know English is frequently cited as a very hard language to learn? Hmm, we wonder why? Well, its difficulty explains the mistakes we all make when speaking. But writing in English has its own unique set of challenges. One of the most common mistakes is telling you’re and your apart. They look similar, right? Even if they sound the same and look like fraternal …

  5. “Daylight Savings Time” And Commonly Mixed-Up Words And Phrases

    Every March and November, most Americans change their clocks to keep up with the switch into or out of daylight-saving time. This practice of advancing the clocks ahead an hour is called daylight-saving time. But, because daylight savings time is used so frequently, the term is also considered acceptable. Daylight-saving time means that since the clock is moved ahead one hour, you get one more …

  6. When To Use “Have” vs. “Has”

    Have and has are different forms of the verb to have. Even though they come from the same word, there are slight differences in the way they’re used. Have is used with I, you, we, and they, while has is used with he, she, and it. The verb to have has many different meanings. Its primary meaning is “to possess, own, hold for use, or …

  7. Empathy vs. Sympathy: Which Word To Use And When

    How are empathy and sympathy the same? The terms empathy and sympathy are often confused, and with good reason. Both of the words deal with the relationship a person has to the feelings and experiences of another person. So, let’s explore the differences between these terms and how they are most commonly used. Both sympathy and empathy have roots in the Greek term páthos meaning “suffering, feeling.” What …

  8. What Is The Difference Between “Immigration” vs. “Emigration”?

    Sometimes you’ll see the terms being used interchangeably, but it’s important to understand what these words mean so you can use them correctly. Who are immigrants and what is immigration? An immigrant is “a person who has moved to another country, usually for permanent residence.” Immigration is “the act of immigrating, or the act of moving to another country.” The key to remembering what this …

  9. Comparatives vs. Superlatives

    Not all things are created equal: some are good, others are better, and only the cream of the crop rise to the level of best. These three words—good, better, and best—are examples of the three forms of an adjective or adverb: positive, comparative, and superlative. What is the positive form? The positive form of an adjective or adverb is the basic form listed in a dictionary—e.g., …

  10. “Their” vs. “There” vs. “They’re”: Do You Know The Difference?

    The trio of their, there, and they’re can flummox writers of all levels. It’s confusing; they are homophones, meaning they have the same pronunciation (sound) but differ in meaning and derivation (origin). Even though they sound the same, they aren’t spelled the same … cue the noticeable errors! Let’s explore the correct usages of the three. How do you use their, there, and they’re? These three words serve many …