Word Facts

  1. How Do You Use The Term “Schatzi”?

    Schatzi is a German term of endearment but how do you use it and what does it actually mean?
  2. Learn About “Mumpsimus” And Other Embarrassing Speech Blunders

  3. The Frabjous Words Invented By Lewis Carroll

    When we think of Lewis Carroll, we think of whimsical worlds … and words. The man who penned Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland, Through the Looking-Glass, “Jabberwocky,“ and countless other timeless poems and works of literature has taken our imaginations to the furthest limits for decades.  His stories—published during the mid- to late-1800s—are full of life, adventure, humor, and some of the most fantastical words. You see, …

  4. These Common Words Have Offensive Histories

  5. “Beeves” And Other Plural Words You Didn’t Know Existed

  6. What Do The Most Well-Known Website Names Mean?

    In the modern world we occupy, tech company names like Google, Yahoo, Amazon, eBay, and others have become a major part of our daily life and conversations. Some of them, like Google, become synonymous with the act itself. If you need to search something, you “just Google it,” which is much like what happened with Xerox when copiers came into vogue. But have you ever stopped …

  7. “Hero” vs. “Protagonist”: What Is The Difference?

    Many stories have one thing in common: a brave main character who ends up saving the day. But does slaying the dragon or defusing the bomb make this person a hero or a protagonist? And can the two words be used interchangeably? The correct answer to both is yes, with the caveat that the words are not always synonymous. Both nouns have multiple definitions and …

  8. “On line” vs. “In line”: Which Do You Say?

    Some people find it easy to tell if someone is from New York or New Jersey the moment they meet them—all they have to do is start chatting! And if the New Yorker’s accent isn’t an immediate giveaway, the phrase on line usually is. In many states across the country, it’s all the same: people stand in line at the grocery store, wait in line …

  9. “Ludicrous” vs. “Ridiculous”: How To Use Each Word

    Ludicrous means something is silly enough to cause amusement. Ridiculous means it’s absurd enough to invite mockery or derision. Ludicrous has a more playful and amusing sense than ridiculous. You probably already knew these two words can be used to describe something that’s nonsensical or silly. But does that mean these two words are synonyms? What does ridiculous mean? We use ridiculous when something is …

  10. Systematic vs. Systemic: There’s A System To The Difference

    The George Floyd protests have brought attention to the word systemic—among many other powerful words that speak to this historic time—like never before. Many activists and public officials are calling to dismantle the systemic racism in policing and other social institutions that are disproportionately killing and oppressing Black people. These calls, and our broader cultural conversation around them, have compelled significant interest in—and considerable confusion …