Word Facts

  1. Why Are There Multiple Spellings Of These Everyday Words?

  2. Is Veterans Day A Big Grammar Mistake?

    What do apostrophes have to do with this federal holiday? Well, there’s a confusing apostrophe in Veterans’ Day—or is there? Veterans Day is often incorrectly written as “Veteran’s Day” or “Veterans’ Day.” But, in fact, it’s apostrophe free. “Veteran’s Day” would definitely be incorrect because it means a day for only one veteran. While “Veterans’ Day” does encompass multiple veterans, that spelling is incorrect according …

  3. “Daylight Savings Time” And Commonly Mixed-Up Words And Phrases

    Every March and November, most Americans change their clocks to keep up with the switch into or out of daylight-saving time. This practice of advancing the clocks ahead an hour is called daylight-saving time. But, because daylight savings time is used so frequently, the term is also considered acceptable. Daylight-saving time means that since the clock is moved ahead one hour, you get one more …

  4. When To Use “Have” vs. “Has”

    Have and has are different forms of the verb to have. Even though they come from the same word, there are slight differences in the way they’re used. Have is used with I, you, we, and they, while has is used with he, she, and it. The verb to have has many different meanings. Its primary meaning is “to possess, own, hold for use, or …

  5. What Are Present, Past, And Sometimes Perfect Participles?

    Participles. They’re verbs, they’re adjectives, they’re perfect and progressive! Is there anything they can’t do? If you’re wondering what a participle does, you’re not alone. These mighty verbs take many forms and can be tricky to master. Let’s explore the different types. To start, participles are words derived from verbs that can function as adjectives or as parts of verb phrases to create verb tenses. …

  6. Words To Help You Explain Your Kid’s First Grade Homework

  7. Empathy vs. Sympathy: Which Word To Use And When

    How are empathy and sympathy the same? The terms empathy and sympathy are often confused, and with good reason. Both of the words deal with the relationship a person has to the feelings and experiences of another person. So, let’s explore the differences between these terms and how they are most commonly used. Both sympathy and empathy have roots in the Greek term páthos meaning “suffering, feeling.” What …

  8. What Is The Difference Between “Immigration” vs. “Emigration”?

    Sometimes you’ll see the terms being used interchangeably, but it’s important to understand what these words mean so you can use them correctly. Who are immigrants and what is immigration? An immigrant is “a person who has moved to another country, usually for permanent residence.” Immigration is “the act of immigrating, or the act of moving to another country.” The key to remembering what this …

  9. Comparatives vs. Superlatives

    Not all things are created equal: some are good, others are better, and only the cream of the crop rise to the level of best. These three words—good, better, and best—are examples of the three forms of an adjective or adverb: positive, comparative, and superlative. What is the positive form? The positive form of an adjective or adverb is the basic form listed in a dictionary—e.g., …

  10. Getty

    What Do “a.m.” And “p.m.” Stand For?

    What does “a.m.” mean? The term we associate with the morning, a.m., is an abbreviation the Latin phrase ante merīdiem meaning “before midday.” What does “p.m.” mean? p.m. is an abbreviation of post merīdiem, meaning—you guessed it—“after midday.” These two terms help keep ambiguity at bay in the 12-hour time system. What does “m” mean? There is a third, lesser-known abbreviation in this system: m. …

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