Word Facts

  1. Words To Help You Explain Your Kid’s First Grade Homework

  2. Empathy vs. Sympathy: Which Word To Use And When

    How are empathy and sympathy the same? The terms empathy and sympathy are often confused, and with good reason. Both of the words deal with the relationship a person has to the feelings and experiences of another person. So, let’s explore the differences between these terms and how they are most commonly used. Both sympathy and empathy have roots in the Greek term páthos meaning “suffering, feeling.” What …

  3. What Is The Difference Between “Immigration” vs. “Emigration”?

    Sometimes you’ll see the terms being used interchangeably, but it’s important to understand what these words mean so you can use them correctly. Who are immigrants and what is immigration? An immigrant is “a person who has moved to another country, usually for permanent residence.” Immigration is “the act of immigrating, or the act of moving to another country.” The key to remembering what this …

  4. Comparatives vs. Superlatives

    Not all things are created equal: some are good, others are better, and only the cream of the crop rise to the level of best. These three words—good, better, and best—are examples of the three forms of an adjective or adverb: positive, comparative, and superlative. What is the positive form? The positive form of an adjective or adverb is the basic form listed in a dictionary—e.g., …

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    What Do “a.m.” And “p.m.” Stand For?

    What does “a.m.” mean? The term we associate with the morning, a.m., is an abbreviation the Latin phrase ante merīdiem meaning “before midday.” What does “p.m.” mean? p.m. is an abbreviation of post merīdiem, meaning—you guessed it—“after midday.” These two terms help keep ambiguity at bay in the 12-hour time system. What does “m” mean? There is a third, lesser-known abbreviation in this system: m. …

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    Words To Know For High School

  7. Are There Any English Words That Have No Vowels?

    It’s a question that just about every English learner has asked: “Are there any English words that have no vowels?” The answer to this depends what you mean by “vowel” and “word.” There are two things we mean by the word vowel: a speech sound made with the vocal tract open, or a letter of the alphabet standing for a spoken vowel. Words with no …

  8. “Their” vs. “There” vs. “They’re”: Do You Know The Difference?

    The trio of their, there, and they’re can flummox writers of all levels. It’s confusing; they are homophones, meaning they have the same pronunciation (sound) but differ in meaning and derivation (origin). Even though they sound the same, they aren’t spelled the same … cue the noticeable errors! Let’s explore the correct usages of the three. How do you use their, there, and they’re? These three words serve many …

  9. Supper vs. Dinner

    In parts of the US, supper and dinner are used interchangeably to refer to the evening meal, but they’re not exactly synonyms.  What do these words mean? Dinner, which dates back to the late 1200s, refers to the main meal of the day—historically, a meal served midday for many peoples. The term comes from the Middle English diner, which, via French, goes back to a …

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    Words To Know For Your First Year Of College