Tag Archives: interest-grammar

  1. Can You Correct These Grammatically Incorrect Song Lyrics?

    These lyrics may be catchy, but there’s one, big grammatical error within them. Can you spot it? 
  2. What Are All Of The Different Ways To Pluralize “You”?

    What's up you guys?! Or wait, should it be what's up y'all? Let's break down all of the ways you can address the plural you.
  3. “Then” vs. “Than”: See If You Know The Difference Between Them

    Then and than are among the 100 most frequently used words in the English language. The fact that they’re so common means that they’re also commonly misused! Do you say I will call you no later than 7 pm or then 7 pm? Would you say the company needs a good accountant more than (or then) ever? Some examples are trickier than others, but you can learn to distinguish …

  4. If A Word Ends In “S,” How Do You Make It Possessive?

    Second only to the use of the Oxford comma, the creation of possessives for words ending in S and the S sound is one of the most hotly debated grammar topics in the English language. The issue isn’t as cut and dried as some grammar rules, such as what punctuation is used to end a declarative sentence. (A period. Why can’t all grammar rules be this …

  5. Canceled vs. Cancelled: Which Is Spelled Correctly?

    by John Kelly, Senior Research Editor at Dictionary.com From March Madness and SXSW to birthday parties and spring break vacations, many gatherings, big and small, have been canceled due to the coronavirus outbreak around the world. … or is it cancelled? Now, spelling may seem like the least of our worries during these trying and unusual times, but many people are curious and still want …

  6. What Are The 6 Major Punctuation Marks?

    What happens when you mix up your punctuation? Well, there’s a million hilarious examples of grammatical mixups that point out the difference between—for example, Let’s eat Grandma vs. Let’s eat, Grandma. There’s even a grammar book named after the phrase eats shoots and leaves, which is what a panda does (as opposed to eats, shoots, and leaves). What a difference a comma can make! But …

  7. How Do You Add Emphasis With Italics?

    If you’re thinking of using italics to emphasize words, keep in mind that the type of writing you do—and what style guide you follow—will determine how you use italics. Italics are typically used to show emphasis (For example: “I don’t care what he thinks. I do what I want!”) or to indicate titles of stand-alone works (Black Panther, Lost in Translation). Different style guides have …

  8. What Are Good Transition Words?

    Imagine this: you’re writing an essay and just jotted down a particularly insightful point. You’ve backed it up with examples, and are feeling pretty good about your work … so, what comes next? If you answered, “a transition word,” you’re right! Transition words do the hard work of connecting one sentence or paragraph to the next. A transition—which sometimes requires a phrase or full sentence—can …

  9. 5 Types Of Nouns That We Use All The Time

    Nouns come in a lot of different shapes and sizes. The major ones are common nouns, proper nouns, abstract nouns, possessive nouns, and collective nouns. First, what is a noun? A noun is a person, place, or thing. The category of things may sound super vague, but in this case it means inanimate objects, abstract concepts, and activities. Phrases and other parts of speech can also …

  10. Accent Marks: Do We Really Need Them?

    Fancy? Fundamental? Or just plain frustrating to deal with? Accent marks draw a mixed reaction from people.  So, do we really need them? Let’s take a look.  What is an accent mark, anyway? Accent marks are diacritic marks, which are added to a letter or character to set them apart from others and “give it a particular phonetic value, to indicate stress, etc.” That makes sense, …