Tag Archives: interest-poetry

  1. Why Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s “I Have A Dream” Was Pure Poetry

    Politicians and political figures often use anaphora in speeches to emphasize their points. A classic example of anaphora comes from Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s “I Have a Dream” speech. King uses the anaphoral phrase, “I have a dream,” to start eight consecutive sentences: “I have a dream that one day even the state of Mississippi … will be transformed into an oasis of freedom …

  2. Haiku Shows Poetry Doesn’t Need To Be Complicated

  3. Slam Poetry Is Helping People Work Through Their Pain

    by Taneesh Khera In this column, we travel the US exploring the minority languages, dialects, and people who call it home. Then, we step back to see what effects they might have on society at large. Today, the spotlight is on slam poetry. What is slam poetry? I figured I’d go to the Starry Plough in Berkeley, California to find out. Started in 1999, they …

  4. Getty

    Poetic Foot Vs. Poetic Meter

    Poetry has a lot of moving parts. If you’re reading this, chances are you’re starting to explore poetic analysis. Poetic foot and meter are a great place to start. Once you have these basics down, the rest becomes a lot easier. What is poetic foot? A poetic foot is “a unit of stressed and unstressed syllables in a line of poetry.”Poetic feet are based on …

  5. 14 Thought-Provoking Quotes About Poetry

  6. 12 Essential Types Of Poetry

  7. writing

    Word Of The Day Poems By You!

      Dry Ink by Samantha O. from Miller Place, NYThe sun is setting. The sailboats are in clusters far out past the buoys. The beach is a picture already painted. A photograph already developed. And though I can feel the sand underneath my feet and the salt on my lips, It has already been. Wind has already brushed through my hair, The end of the …

  8. What Is Negative Capability?

    On December 21, 1817, the poet John Keats wrote a letter to his brother in which he expressed and named a quality of human existence that’s tricky to articulate. Keats’ formulation has been adopted by philosophers, poets, and others ever since. How did Keats make up a new concept? Keats wanted to name our ability to simultaneously acknowledge the unpredictable nature of events and conduct ourselves with confidence and …