Tag Archives: interest-science

  1. “Contagious” vs. “Infectious”: The Difference Can Be Important

    by John Kelly, Senior Research Editor at Dictionary.com Whether it’s flu season, chickenpox at your kid’s school, concerns about measles in your town, or the coronavirus pandemic, the words contagious and infectious often come around in news and social media, in casual conversations and government communications. While these two terms get used interchangeably, knowing the difference between them can, in some cases, be life-saving. To …

  2. Take An Aquarium Word Trip With Dictionary.com And Georgia Aquarium

    One of the easiest and most fun learning activities to do while distance learning is to take a virtual field trip. During the Covid-19 pandemic, educational spaces like museums, national parks, and even NASA are opening their doors for virtual tours. For kids who love learning about animals and the environment, one recommended stop is Georgia Aquarium. Even if you don’t live anywhere near Atlanta, …

  3. 10 Types Of “Ologists” You Ought To Know Right Now

  4. “Morbidity” vs. “Mortality”: What Is The Difference?

    Although we’d all love to think we’ll be able to live forever, at some point, we will die. And there’s no way of knowing exactly when that will be. Yes, it’s gloomy to think about this … but is it our morbidity or our mortality that we need to come to terms with? The correct answer here is mortality—although the topic is quite morbid. These …

  5. “Antibiotic” vs. “Abiotic” vs. “Antibody”: What Is The Difference?

    by John Kelly, Senior Research Editor at Dictionary.com In our article on virus vs. bacteria, we noted that vaccines can work on both viruses and bacteria. Antibiotics, however, are only effective against bacteria. But what is an antibiotic, exactly, and how is it different from another, frustratingly similar word: abiotic? And how do both of these words compare to antibody and antigen? This is a …

  6. “Virus” vs. “Bacteria”: What’s The Difference?

    It’s easy to confuse viruses and bacteria. They are both extremely tiny, for one thing, and, depending on what kind of bug you get, they can make you sick. OK, “extremely tiny” and “make you sick”? We do have technical words for these things. Viruses and bacteria are microscopic, meaning they are too small to see with the unaided eye. And pathogens are “disease-producing agents,” …

  7. Is The Coronavirus A Plague?

    by John Kelly, Senior Research Editor at Dictionary.com Most of us have never lived through a pandemic like the coronavirus before, but we have heard or learned about them, from the Spanish flu to, more notoriously, the plague, like the Black Death. And perhaps, as you’ve followed the news or talked to people about COVID-19, you have even heard the coronavirus called a “plague.” No, …

  8. Are GMOs Good Or Bad?

    GMO foods have been around since the 1980s ... so why don't we know if they are good or bad yet?
  9. Are These Foods Fruits, Vegetables, Or Berries?

    How can we know what is a fruit? A vegetable? A berry? A nut? Doesn't it seem like it's always changing? Why is it so confusing?
  10. Getty

    How Are Newly Discovered Chemical Elements Named?

    In 2011, the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC) recognized the discovery of two new chemical elements: flerovium and livermorium. With the chemical symbols of Fl and Lv, these names became official in 2012. Until the discovery of these predicted elements occurred, they were known as ununquadium and ununhexium, which is scientific Latin for 114 and 116, respectively. These numbers correspond to their atomic …