Tag Archives: interest-waystosay

  1. Kids Redefine Nostalgic Words From Your Past

    This kid definitely showed us a new, hilarious perspective on nostalgic words we used to say all the time!
  2. How Do You Feel About These Parenting Buzzwords?

    The language of parenting is constantly evolving, and these changes often occur in tandem with new parenting movements and styles. The early 20th-century authoritarian style of parenting gave way to a more permissive parent in the ’60s and ’70s. The ’80s and ’90s parent became more intricately involved and focused on building their children’s self-esteem. Trophies for everyone! Now, in the early 21st century, the …

  3. Farther vs. Further

    Differentiating two words that go the distance… Do you use farther and further interchangeably? You’re not alone. The terms have very similar meanings, and English speakers have been using them as synonyms for centuries. But if you’re ready to get picky, there is one major difference that can guide your usage of these words! The widely accepted rule is to use farther when being literal and …

  4. Proved vs. Proven

    Have you proved your point, or proven it? Both words are both forms of the verb prove, which means “to establish truth through evidence or argument.” Both words are past participles, which basically means they completed actions that took place in the past. Generally speaking, proved and proven are interchangeable. You can usually choose between the two words based upon which one sounds better in the …

  5. Paramount vs. Tantamount

    Turns out, paramount doesn’t have that much to do with mountains. It does, however, describe something that’s of highest importance. Tantamount, on the other hand, refers to something that’s equal to something else. While the two words sound similar, that’s really all they have in common. Paramount Paramount is an adjective meaning “of utmost importance.” It can also describe someone with the highest level of …

  6. “Palette” vs. “Pallet” vs. “Palate”

    Palette, pallet, and palate are homophones, which means they’re all pronounced the same way, but mean different things. Palette is mostly related to art. Pallet often refers to shipping equipment. Palate has several meanings related to taste. If you’re looking for a little more detail than that, read on. Palette When you picture a painter, you probably imagine them holding a flat board with a …

  7. Overwhelm vs. Underwhelm

    These two might seem like straightforward antonyms, but there are a few differences to keep in mind. Overwhelm is a verb that means “to overpower” or “to cover or bury.” Underwhelm means “to fail to impress.” Basically, these words have opposite meanings. Overwhelm Overwhelm is a versatile verb. A situation can overwhelm someone. That same person can be overwhelmed by a situation. They might describe …

  8. Older vs. Elder: Are You Using Them Correctly?

    Both older and elder describe someone or something with the higher age in a comparison. Basically, they can both be the opposite of younger. They’re similar words that are usually interchangeable. For example, let’s say a woman has two sons, one 15 years old and one 18 years old. She could describe the 18-year-old boy as her older son or her elder son, and the …

  9. Math vs. Maths

    Both math and maths are short for the word mathematics. Math is the preferred term in the United States and Canada. Maths is the preferred term in the United Kingdom, Ireland, Australia, and other English-speaking places. Math The word math can refer to either the discipline or subject of mathematics. It can also refer to mathematical procedures. In a sentence like “She enjoys studying math …

  10. Loath vs. Loathe

    It can be easy to mix up loath and loathe because of their extremely similar spellings, but here’s the difference: Loath is an adjective that means reluctant. Loathe is a transitive verb that means to be disgusted with. The fact that both words carry negative connotations also makes it easy to confuse them. It might help to know that their pronunciations are slightly different. Loath …