Tag Archives: interest-waystosay

  1. Kudo vs. Kudos

    You’ve probably heard these words floating around various celebrations, but do you know the difference? Kudos is a noun that means “praise, honor, or acclaim.” Kudo is the singular version of kudos, but kudos is also singular. Kudos comes from the Greek word kydos, which means praise or renown. Kudos are usually offered in response to an exceptional achievement. A Brief History of Kudos The …

  2. Intrusive vs. Obtrusive

    Intrusive and obtrusive both refer to invading a situation. Obtrusive is the more intentional one of these. The meanings and sounds of both words are close enough that it can be easy to confuse them. Some thesauruses present the words as synonyms, but there are a few subtle distinctions between them. Similarities These two words have very similar meanings. They both involve inserting oneself into …

  3. Insidious vs. Invidious

    Insidious and invidious both describe the way someone does something bad. Insidious implies secrecy, while invidious is more open. An insidious action is sneaky and harmful. An invidious action is also negative, but it happens out in the open. Insidious Insidious actions are covert. Those who carry them out hope to accomplish some act of evil. For example, lies are insidious. Secret meetings and intrigue …

  4. Inhibit vs. Prohibit

    Inhibit and prohibit are both verbs that mean to prevent or to forbid. Both verbs require a direct object to make sense, and they always involve two parties. Though both words have similar definitions, inhibit and prohibit aren’t interchangeable. In general, someone is inhibited by internal feelings or prohibited by an external source. Inhibit Inhibit is a verb with several meanings, including “to restrain, hinder, …

  5. Ingenious vs. Ingenuous

    Are you ready, Grammar Genius? Both ingenious and ingenuous are adjectives. Ingenious indicates cleverness or intelligence, while ingenuous refers to sincerity or a naive nature. How To Use Ingenious When you say ingenious out loud, it sounds like a combination of the words in and genius. Since a genius is an intelligent person, you can use that part of the word to associate ingenious with …

  6. What “Occupy” Used To Mean May Make You Blush

    Recently, we looked up the etymology of the word occupy. We found an unexpected obsolete definition. The term occupy formerly meant something very different than its current common meaning. From the early 1500s to the 1800s, occupy was used to refer to sexual relations, as in “to occupy a woman” as defined in the Lexicon Balatronicum in 1811. When occupy was used in that sense, …