Tag Archives: interest-wordfacts

  1. English Words That Came From Hindi And Urdu

    How many words from Hindi and Urdu do you know? Well, if you’re one of the approximately 70 million speakers of Urdu and 425 million of Hindi, then, well, you know a lot—and that’s only counting native speakers. Millions more speak Urdu and Hindi as a second language all around the globe, making them, combined, one of the most spoken languages.  But even if you …

  2. Nazi vs. Fascist: Is There Really A Difference?

    Fascist and Nazi: these two words loom large in the history books and in heated conversations about politics—conversations that have far outlasted the regimes that originally embraced them. For many of us, the words fascist and Nazi bring to mind the worst dictators and crimes against humanity. But as these ideologies make the news in 2020, used especially in the context of a growing concern about …

  3. How To Know If A Term Is One Words Or Two Words

    English loves to take existing words and smash them together so they act as one unit. This is called compounding. But how do you know if a word is one word or two?
  4. What Are Examples Of Hyperbole?

    Hyperbole is a super-exaggerated way of describing something for the sake of emphasis that often borders on the fantastical or ridiculous. But what are some examples of hyperbole?
  5. “Libel” vs. “Slander”: How To Tell The Difference

    If you spread a nasty rumor about your boss, are you engaging in slander? Can a politician sue a newspaper for libel if an article calls her a liar? What do these two words mean, and are they interchangeable? Since both are types of defamation or “the act of making negative statements that hurt another person’s reputation,” and also illegal, you’ll want to make sure …

  6. What’s Another Word For “Cute”?

    When cute won’t cut it, try these words instead Puppies are undeniably cute, as are toddlers, bunnies, and Baby Yoda. Beyond that, however, cute just doesn’t always cut it.  An adjective, cute is defined as “attractive, especially in a dainty way; pleasingly pretty.” It sounds nice enough, and there are certainly cases in which it’s used with the best of intentions. In other cases, however, it’s …

  7. “Ludicrous” vs. “Ridiculous”: How To Use Each Word

    Ludicrous means something is silly enough to cause amusement. Ridiculous means it’s absurd enough to invite mockery or derision. Ludicrous has a more playful and amusing sense than ridiculous. You probably already knew these two words can be used to describe something that’s nonsensical or silly. But does that mean these two words are synonyms? What does ridiculous mean? We use ridiculous when something is …

  8. Where The Bleep Did That Curse Word Come From?

  9. Eight Words To Use Instead Of “Lame”

  10. “Uncharted” vs. “Unchartered”

    Before you dive into the unknown, there’s one thing you should clear up: are you preparing to venture into uncharted or unchartered territory? We’ll make it easy for you: the answer here is uncharted, since you’re going to explore the unknown. So then what is unchartered? Keep reading for more on how to use each of these words and when. What does uncharted mean? The adjective …