Tag Archives: interest-writing

  1. Punctuation Marks You Should Consider Using

    We’re all familiar with commas, periods, hyphens, and the like. Although semicolons can be confusing, we pretty much know what we’re doing when we punctuate a sentence. But don’t you get a little bored using the same old marks? Do you ever find yourself searching for the perfect way to convey a certain mood? As you’ll see, extra punctuation marks have been suggested at various …

  2. When Do You Use “Whom” vs. “Who”?

    Over the last 200 years, the pronoun whom has been on a steady decline. Despite its waning use in speech and ongoing speculation about its imminent extinction, whom still holds a spot in the English language, particularly in formal writing. Understanding when and how to use this pronoun can set your writing apart. If whom is on the decline, then who must be growing in popularity. The two—as …

  3. “Then” vs. “Than”: See If You Know The Difference Between Them

    Then and than are among the 100 most frequently used words in the English language. The fact that they’re so common means that they’re also commonly misused! Do you say I will call you no later than 7 pm or then 7 pm? Would you say the company needs a good accountant more than (or then) ever? Some examples are trickier than others, but you can learn to distinguish …

  4. Why Do We Use Uppercase And Lowercase Letters?

    Learning to write is a major milestone, and your little one will inevitably have some questions about why we do things the way we do during the process. We’re here to help you answer them. For example, a beginning writer might want to know how the letter W developed (why is it called double-U?) and why Q so often needs U. Another question sure to pop up …

  5. “Capital” vs. “Capitol” : Do You Know Where You’re Going?

    Capital and capitol are both commonly used in political contexts and are separated by just one letter, making them frustratingly easy to confuse. When it comes to these two terms, it’s important to note that one has a number of meanings while the other refers to a certain type of building. What is a capital? Capital has many definitions. It can mean “the wealth owned …

  6. Better Words To Use Instead Of “Psycho”

    Psycho, when used as a noun, refers to “a crazy or mentally unstable person.” As an adjective, it describes a subject that’s “psychopathic or psychotic.” In fact, the word was first recorded in the 1930s as an abbreviated form of the terms psychological or psychotic. Since then, psycho has developed into one of pop culture’s favorite words to conjure up images of menacing killers and monsters that …

  7. “Affect” vs. “Effect”: Use The Correct Word Every Time

    Affect or effect? Both of these words are verbs and nouns and their meanings overlap. Very confusing! This slippery duo can send even experienced writers into a spiral of uncertainty. Especially, since many people pronounce them in almost the exact same way. Here’s a basic guideline for affect vs effect: Generally, we use affect as a verb (an action word) and effect as a noun …

  8. Marshal vs. Martial: Do You Know The Difference?

    It’s not enough that martial and marshal are pronounced the same, is it? No, the English language has to further complicate things, because while these homophones, martial and marshal, have different meanings, they both involve some overlapping concepts of law and war. And adding to the understandable confusion of these words is marshall, with two Ls. Let’s marshal, shall we say, the facts, and bring …

  9. Why Do We Use Symbols To Censor Swearwords?

    When the force of a swearword is too extreme (but some form of cuss must be used) symbolic stand-ins have long been used for lewdness. Suffice it to say, any emotional keyboard-striker can blurt out something that people perceive as a sub for swears. Whether it’s to diminish the force of swear, to get around censorship rules, or maybe just because symbols are @#$%ing cool to look at, …

  10. What Are The 6 Major Punctuation Marks?

    What happens when you mix up your punctuation? Well, there’s a million hilarious examples of grammatical mixups that point out the difference between—for example, Let’s eat Grandma vs. Let’s eat, Grandma. There’s even a grammar book named after the phrase eats shoots and leaves, which is what a panda does (as opposed to eats, shoots, and leaves). What a difference a comma can make! But …