Tag Archives: type-article

  1. What Character Was Removed From The Alphabet?

    Johnson & Johnson, Barnes & Noble, Dolce & Gabbana: the ampersand today is used primarily in business names, but that small character was actually once the 27th member of the alphabet. Where did it come from though? The origin of its name is almost as bizarre as the name itself. Where did ampersand come from? The shape of the character (&) predates the word ampersand by more …

  2. What Does “Craft Beer” Actually Mean?

    by Alyssa Pereira Not all beers are made equal. That much is made apparent in a walk through any local market anywhere in the US. The majority of beer sections in American grocery stores and neighborhood bodegas aren’t exactly artisan creations. Rather, they’re mass-produced, packaged, and sold by one of just a few international beverage conglomerates. But alongside them, if you look carefully, you’ll often …

  3. Why The Phrase “Commit Suicide” Isn’t The Right Way To Talk About Suicide

    by Rory Gory | updated by John Kelly, senior research editor at Dictionary.com There are many stigmas and misconceptions surrounding mental illness, but it’s quite common to experience it. Nearly one in five US adults live with a mental illness, translating to about 46.6 million people as of 2017. Whether or not you live with a mental illness, mental health is something that all of …

  4. “Use To” vs. “Used To”: What’s The Difference?

    Remember as kids when we used to look forward to summer break every year? Unfortunately as we get older, we don’t have this mandated chunk of time off from work every year. But did we use to count down the days until school was out? Or did we used to look forward to the last day of school each year? Despite the minor difference—literally just …

  5. What Is The Meaning Of Labor Day?

    For many of us, Labor Day means the end of summer vacation, a guilt trip for anyone wearing white, and an excuse for department stores to have sales. But, it’s important to keep in mind the true history behind this holiday: Labor Day is a celebration of laborers, of workers. And, it was introduced at a time when labor meant something far more grueling than …

  6. Dictionary.com Releases Its Biggest Update Ever

    Over 15,000 entries updated on topics ranging from race and sexual orientation to climate and internet culture The unprecedented events of 2020, from the pandemic to the protests, have profoundly changed our lives—and language. As we explained in our April additions to the dictionary, COVID-19 rapidly introduced an array of new and newly prominent technical terms to our everyday vocabularies, including asymptomatic, viral load, and …

  7. “Alpaca” vs. “Llama”: What Is The Difference?

    Move over flamingos, unicorns, and sloths, there’s another another animal that’s starting to take over as the trendy addition to mugs, clothing, and accessories. But are these adorable shaggy mammals popping up across home goods, clothing, and toys llamas? Or are these sweet, fluffy creatures that people adore called alpacas? And what’s the difference between the two? Despite being commonly mixed up, llamas and alpacas are …

  8. “Barbecuing,” “Grilling,” And “Smoking”: What’s The Difference?

    Every year as the weather heats up, grills are dusted off and meats and vegetables are thrown on the fire. To those in the West and many northern cities, this is barbecuing. Just don’t call it that in the South or parts of the Midwest like Kansas City, Mo., because in certain regions, not everything cooked on a grill is called barbecue. The word barbecue means different …

  9. Why Does September Come From The Word “Seven”?

    For many, the month of September signals the end of summer, the beginning of autumn, and the start of a new school year. With respect to the calendar, September marks the beginning of the series of months named after their numerical position in the year. Strangely enough, however, September is not named after the number nine. What does September mean? September comes from the Latin …

  10. Why Do We Have “Red States” And “Blue States”?

    If you’ve watched (or even tried to avoid) the news as a presidential election heats up, you’re probably well aware that political pundits like to use the color red to represent the Republican Party and blue for the Democratic Party. A “red state” votes Republican in presidential elections and Senate races, while a “blue state” leans Democratic. No matter which news program you favor, they …