Tag Archives: video-history

  1. The Mind-Bending Stroop Effect: Don’t Read These Words!

    WARNING: Your brain is about to experience conflict and interference, while executing a suspiciously mundane task.
  2. The Dirtiest Words … That Aren’t

    Pull your minds out of the gutter for this show!
  3. Snowflake: From Winter Wonderland to Petty Insult

    Every snowflake is unique. Reclaim the snow. Snowflake is one of the words that has taken a jump from normal noun to pointed insult. When used as an insult, it means that someone is easily offended and has a hard time accepting anything outside of their comfort zone. It’s often used against younger people (generally, those of the millennial generation) and left-leaning people.
  4. Slang Every 90s Kid Knows

    Props if you're in the know. If not, watch this ...
  5. Let’s Talk About Bitchface

    Yes, bitchface is a word. Some people may find that offensive (why do we swear, anyway?), but it's also interesting that the word describes a reality that often causes offense—unintentionally!
  6. How Drunk Are You?

    Sloshed, sozzled, soused, snockered ... if you're drunk you're probably all of these words.
  7. Do You Know The Real Names Of These Doohickeys?

    Play along . . . and guess the definition of these "thingys" before they're revealed.
  8. Deadpan: From American Slang to Comedic Style

    Deadpan is often used in comedy to make viewers feel uncomfortable, or to add contrast to an otherwise slapstick set. This term is an Americanism from the 1920s, when it started being used as slang for the face itself.
  9. Slut: From Dirty to Empowering

    Most women (and probably some men, too!) can recall a time they were called a slut.
  10. How Snowflake Went From Winter Wonderland to Petty Insult

    Every snowflake is unique. Reclaim the snow. Snowflake is one of the words that has taken a jump from normal noun to pointed insult. When used as an insult, it means that someone is easily offended and has a hard time accepting anything outside of their comfort zone. It’s often used against younger people (generally, those of the millennial generation) and left-leaning people.