Word of the Day

Friday, June 29, 2018

flexitarian

[ flek-si-tair-ee-uhn ]

noun

a person whose diet is mostly vegetarian but sometimes includes meat, fish, or poultry.

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What is the origin of flexitarian?

Flexitarian was first recorded in 1990-95. It’s a portemanteau of the words flexible and vegetarian.

how is flexitarian used?

A flexitarian is someone who rarely, though occasionally, consumes meat, including red meat, poultry, and seafood. A climatarian is someone who eats less meat—especially the most energy-consuming meats, like beef and lamb—specifically for environmental reasons.

Brian Kateman, "Beyond 'Vegetarian'," Atlantic, March 14, 2016

The moderate, conscious eater—the flexitarian—knows where the goal lies: a diet that’s higher in plants and lower in both animal products and hyperprocessed foods, the stuff that makes up something like three-quarters of what’s sold in supermarkets.

Mark Bittman, "Healthy, Meet Delicious," New York Times, April 23, 2013
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Thursday, June 28, 2018

transmundane

[ trans-muhn-deyn, tranz-; trans-muhn-deyn, tranz- ]

adjective

reaching beyond or existing outside the physical or visible world.

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What is the origin of transmundane?

Transmundane was first recorded in 1770-80. It combines Latin trans- “beyond” and mundane, which finds its roots in the Latin word meaning “world.”

how is transmundane used?

Below me along the lifelines I was aware of many sailors joining in these observations, gazing dumbstruck at it as something transmundane.

William Brinkley, The Last Ship, 1988

… a common labourer and a travelling tinker had propounded and discussed one of the most ancient theories of transmundane dominion and influence on mundane affairs.

George Meredith, The Ordeal of Richard Feverel, 1859
Wednesday, June 27, 2018

farouche

[ fa-roosh ]

adjective

French. sullenly unsociable or shy.

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What is the origin of farouche?

The adjective farouche, accented on the second syllable, shows that it is still an unnaturalized borrowing from French. The Old French adjective faroche, forasche derives from the Late Latin forāsticus “belonging outside or out of doors” (i.e., not fit to be inside), a derivative of the adverb and preposition forās (also forīs) “(to the) outside, abroad.” A similar semantic development can be seen in savage, from Middle French salvage, sauvage, from Medieval Latin salvāticus (Latin silvāticus) “pertaining to the woods.” Farouche entered English in the 18th century.

how is farouche used?

He’s a bit farouche, but I like the way he enthuses about what interests him. It’s not put on.

Richard Aldington, Death of a Hero, 1929

Many of the women in these stories are farouche–they’re outsiders, they’re troubled, they lack polish, they dream too much.

Joy Williams, "Introducion" Fantastic Women: 18 tales of the surreal and the sublime from Tin House, 2011

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