Try Our Apps
Dictionary.com

follow Dictionary.com

Word of the Day
Sunday, February 25, 2018

Definitions for mores

  1. Sociology. folkways of central importance accepted without question and embodying the fundamental moral views of a group.

Learn something
new every day


GET OUR


Thank youfor signing up
Get the Word of the Day Email
Citations for mores
... as Lincoln now feared, with the passing of this noble generation, “if the laws be continually despised and disregarded, if their rights to be secure in their persons and property, are held by no better tenure than the caprice of a mob, the alienation of their affections from the Government is the natural consequence.” To fortify against this, Lincoln essentially proposed that the national mores of America—taught in every classroom, preached in every church, proclaimed in every legislative hall—must revolve around “reverence” to the laws ... David Bahr, "Abraham Lincoln's Political Menagerie," Forbes, June 29, 2017
... the artist has always considered himself beyond the mores of the community in which he lived. Philip Roth, The Ghost Writer, 1979
Origin of mores
1905-1910
The Latin noun mōrēs is the plural of mōs “custom, habit, usage, wont.” The Latin noun, whether singular or plural, has a wider range of usage than English mores has. Mōs may be good, bad, or indifferent: in Cicero’s usage the phrase mōs mājōrum “custom of our ancestors” is roughly equivalent to “constitution”; mōs sinister means “perverted custom," literally “left-handed”; and Horace used to walk along the Via Sacra as was his habit (mōs). Mores entered English in the late 19th century.