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Word of the Day
Thursday, March 15, 2018

Definitions for dekko

  1. British Slang. a look or glance.

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Citations for dekko
I'll have a dekko at the furnace, and see what tools I need. Helen Dunmore, The Lie, 2014
Oh yes, he's here, replied Monteiro Rossi, but he doesn't like to burst in just like that, he's sent me on ahead to take a dekko. Antonio Tabucchi, Pereira Declares, translated by Patrick Creagh, 1995
Origin of dekko
1890-1895
It is hard to believe that dekko, originally British army slang meaning "to look; a look," is related to dragon. Dekko and dragon both ultimately come from the Proto-Indo-European root derk- (and its variant dṛk-) “to see, look.” The form derk- forms Greek dérkesthai “to look”; the variant dṛk- forms the Greek aorist (a kind of past tense) édrakon “I saw, looked,” the aorist active participle drakṓn “looking,” and the noun drákōn “serpent, (huge) snake,” also the name of a winged mythical monster, half reptilian, half mammalian, whose look could kill. In Sanskrit the root derk- forms the causative verb darśáyati “(he) makes see.” The Sanskrit root darś-, dṛś- develops into the Hindi root dekh- “to see,” which forms the infinitive dekhnā “to see,” and the imperative dekho “look, see.” Dekko entered English in the late 19th century.
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