Try Our Apps
Dictionary.com

follow Dictionary.com

Word of the Day
Wednesday, March 21, 2018

Definitions for disjune

  1. Scot. Obsolete. breakfast.

Learn something
new every day


GET OUR


Thank youfor signing up
Get the Word of the Day Email
Citations for disjune
Take a disjune of muscadel and eggs! Ben Jonson, The New Inn, 1629
And when the two comrades were in the midst of their disjune the knight began to ask the monk (who knew everybody) about the barge he had seen the day before. Arthur Machen, "The Spigot Clerk's Second Tale," The Chronicle of Clemendy, 1888
Origin of disjune
late Middle English
1485-1495
The rare word disjune is formed from the Old French prefix des-, dis-, which comes from the Latin prefix dis- “apart, asunder, in two, in different directions” (the prefix dis- is related to the Latin numeral duo “two”). The Latin prefix may also be used like the English prefix un- to express the reverse or negative of the positive, e.g., untie, undo. Old French desjeün is thus an “unfast.” The Old French element -jun, -jeün comes from the Latin adjective jējūnus “hungry, fasting” and by extension “poor, barren.” In Medieval Latin the noun jējūnum (the neuter singular of the Latin adjective jējūnus) means “middle part of the small intestine,” so called because the jejunum was often found empty after death. The etymology of Latin jējūnus is unknown. The noun disjune entered English in the late 15th century; its use as a verb dates from the late 16th century.